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Steve Reich, Richard Serra, and the Discovery of Process

Steve Reich, Richard Serra, and the Discovery of Process Steve Reich, Richard Serra, and the Discovery of Process Michael Maizels The work, the act, translates the psychologically given into the intentional, into a “world”—and thus transcends it. Harold Rosenberg, “The American Action Painters” WHOOP —— WHOOP F our microphones swing, pendulum-like, from crossbeams suspended just beneath the ceiling. They pick up speed as they rush downward, passing just above upturned speakers sitting on the floor. The microphones pick up little signal as they swing through the air, but as they cross over a narrow airspace just above the speakers, they briefly catch feedback and produce a blurry, almost percussive sound. At the outset of the piece, the microphones are released simultaneously, but eventually, they begin to move out of synchronization. Whoop/ Whoop—silence—Whoop/Whoop. As the microphone swings drift in and out of phase with each other, the feedback sounds evolve into an intricate rhythm that, eventually, unravels as the microphones come to rest and the piece ends. As a kind of sound-producing sculpture, as well experimental music composition, Steve Reich’s Pendulum Music stands as an important predecessor for the contemporary florescence of work done in the borderlands between art and music. But while Reich’s composition points forward, as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Steve Reich, Richard Serra, and the Discovery of Process

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2017 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Steve Reich, Richard Serra, and the Discovery of Process Michael Maizels The work, the act, translates the psychologically given into the intentional, into a “world”—and thus transcends it. Harold Rosenberg, “The American Action Painters” WHOOP —— WHOOP F our microphones swing, pendulum-like, from crossbeams suspended just beneath the ceiling. They pick up speed as they rush downward, passing just above upturned speakers sitting on the floor. The microphones pick up little signal as they swing through the air, but as they cross over a narrow airspace just above the speakers, they briefly catch feedback and produce a blurry, almost percussive sound. At the outset of the piece, the microphones are released simultaneously, but eventually, they begin to move out of synchronization. Whoop/ Whoop—silence—Whoop/Whoop. As the microphone swings drift in and out of phase with each other, the feedback sounds evolve into an intricate rhythm that, eventually, unravels as the microphones come to rest and the piece ends. As a kind of sound-producing sculpture, as well experimental music composition, Steve Reich’s Pendulum Music stands as an important predecessor for the contemporary florescence of work done in the borderlands between art and music. But while Reich’s composition points forward, as

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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