Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Round Table: Tate Modern**

Round Table: Tate Modern** Round Table: Tate Modern* Mignon Nixon: Let me start by offering a question that has preoccupied me since Tate Modern opened a year ago: Just what is it that makes Tate Modern so different, so appealing? The question comes, of course, from Richard Hamilton’s collage of mass-cultural imagery, Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?, which was used as the poster for the This Is Tomorrow exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. The work of Hamilton and the Independent Group has been analyzed as a model of horizontality, reorienting art toward a broader visual culture. Tate Modern’s account of twentieth-century art plays down the history of the Independent Group. But I wonder if the future- or iented IG, and it s involvement with popular culture, new technologies, and public space, might be a useful past to retain in thinking about a museum that exploits techniques of juxtaposition, pastiche, and anachronism to promote the contemporary. A positive reading of Tate Modern’s strategies of display might be that they cut across old hierarchies to make the museum a more popular public place. A more critical reading might be that these ostensibly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

Round Table: Tate Modern**

October , Volume Fall 2001 (98) – Oct 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/round-table-tate-modern-g8d0746SIi
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2001 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/octo.2001.98.1.3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Round Table: Tate Modern* Mignon Nixon: Let me start by offering a question that has preoccupied me since Tate Modern opened a year ago: Just what is it that makes Tate Modern so different, so appealing? The question comes, of course, from Richard Hamilton’s collage of mass-cultural imagery, Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?, which was used as the poster for the This Is Tomorrow exhibition at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London in 1956. The work of Hamilton and the Independent Group has been analyzed as a model of horizontality, reorienting art toward a broader visual culture. Tate Modern’s account of twentieth-century art plays down the history of the Independent Group. But I wonder if the future- or iented IG, and it s involvement with popular culture, new technologies, and public space, might be a useful past to retain in thinking about a museum that exploits techniques of juxtaposition, pastiche, and anachronism to promote the contemporary. A positive reading of Tate Modern’s strategies of display might be that they cut across old hierarchies to make the museum a more popular public place. A more critical reading might be that these ostensibly

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.