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Romance of the Rose (Excerpt)

Romance of the Rose (Excerpt) Music and libretto by Kate Soper nspired by the bizarre and audacious thirteenth-century poem of the same name, The Romance of the Rose mixes medieval and contemporary allegory to drama- Itize the ways in which love, sex, and music wreak havoc on our sense of self. Lulled into a dreamlike state by a seductive M.C., “The Dreamer,” the members of the audience follow their modern-day avatar “The Lover” into a surreal landscape brimming with riddles. On a mission for the conquest of a literal rose, The Lover meets The God of Love, Lady Reason, Shame, and their retinues, but as the fable unfolds, these allegorical figures begin to warp, revealing the fractured sense of identity at the core of all human experience. Meanwhile, the music itself for this opera in two acts and two epilogues—with its modernistic shrieks and wails, mad- rigalistic finery, auto-tuned didacticism, and lush Romanticism—freely beguiles, charms, and terrifies with no moral allegiances. Le Roman de la Rose by Guillaume de Loris and Jean de Meun is the literary source for this new work. The cast features seven singing actors (three sopranos, mezzo, tenor, and two baritones). The ensem- ble includes clarinet, saxophone, piano/keyboard, electric guitar, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Romance of the Rose (Excerpt)

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 44 (2): 13 – May 1, 2022

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2022 Kate Soper
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj_a_00609
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Music and libretto by Kate Soper nspired by the bizarre and audacious thirteenth-century poem of the same name, The Romance of the Rose mixes medieval and contemporary allegory to drama- Itize the ways in which love, sex, and music wreak havoc on our sense of self. Lulled into a dreamlike state by a seductive M.C., “The Dreamer,” the members of the audience follow their modern-day avatar “The Lover” into a surreal landscape brimming with riddles. On a mission for the conquest of a literal rose, The Lover meets The God of Love, Lady Reason, Shame, and their retinues, but as the fable unfolds, these allegorical figures begin to warp, revealing the fractured sense of identity at the core of all human experience. Meanwhile, the music itself for this opera in two acts and two epilogues—with its modernistic shrieks and wails, mad- rigalistic finery, auto-tuned didacticism, and lush Romanticism—freely beguiles, charms, and terrifies with no moral allegiances. Le Roman de la Rose by Guillaume de Loris and Jean de Meun is the literary source for this new work. The cast features seven singing actors (three sopranos, mezzo, tenor, and two baritones). The ensem- ble includes clarinet, saxophone, piano/keyboard, electric guitar,

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2022

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