Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Report from Kabul

Report from Kabul REPORT FROM KABUL Renate Klett Kabul Theatre Festival, Afghanistan, August 25–31, 2007. D ubai International Airport— not the glitzy section, with its crazy combination of promenades lined by artificial palm trees and luxury boutiques, its wet bars and veiled women—but the remote Terminal 2 with flights to the crisis zones. Only men board the plane for Baghdad; they look like mercenaries in civilian clothes, and most are Americans. The flight to Kabul has fewer Americans, more women, and even some children—that is, somehow, consoling. And the fact that you may bring your water bottle through all the security checkpoints is an act of mercy given the murderous heat. The first impression of Kabul is surprisingly peaceful and relaxed: dust and bustling bazaars, mule-driven carts next to SUVs, traffic jams and women in blue burkas. In the city center children sell chewing gum, wash windshields, or beg, in the residential areas they enjoy flying their kites and welcome every foreigner with a dazzling Howareyou. Armed guards and security gates are everywhere, of course, and at the hotel entrance, the undersides of cars are inspected with huge mirrors as in the bad old times of © 2008 Renate Klett the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/report-from-kabul-YboJF802Pq
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2008 Renate Klett
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj.2008.30.1.85
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REPORT FROM KABUL Renate Klett Kabul Theatre Festival, Afghanistan, August 25–31, 2007. D ubai International Airport— not the glitzy section, with its crazy combination of promenades lined by artificial palm trees and luxury boutiques, its wet bars and veiled women—but the remote Terminal 2 with flights to the crisis zones. Only men board the plane for Baghdad; they look like mercenaries in civilian clothes, and most are Americans. The flight to Kabul has fewer Americans, more women, and even some children—that is, somehow, consoling. And the fact that you may bring your water bottle through all the security checkpoints is an act of mercy given the murderous heat. The first impression of Kabul is surprisingly peaceful and relaxed: dust and bustling bazaars, mule-driven carts next to SUVs, traffic jams and women in blue burkas. In the city center children sell chewing gum, wash windshields, or beg, in the residential areas they enjoy flying their kites and welcome every foreigner with a dazzling Howareyou. Armed guards and security gates are everywhere, of course, and at the hotel entrance, the undersides of cars are inspected with huge mirrors as in the bad old times of © 2008 Renate Klett the

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.