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Pure Raw: Performance, Pedagogy, and (Re)presentation

Pure Raw: Performance, Pedagogy, and (Re)presentation PURE RAW Performance, Pedagogy, and (Re)presentation Marina Abramovic; interviewed by Chris Thompson and Katarina Weslien M arina Abramovic; has been pushing the limits of performance for over three decades. From 1965–70 she studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade, and soon after that at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, where she later taught. In 1970 she began working with sound environments, film, video, and performance. Five years later she met the artist Ulay (Uwe Laysiepen) in Amsterdam, with whom she worked until 1988. Together they devised performances that centered on the limits of human endurance, consciousness, and perception. Working independently since then, she has exhibited, performed, and taught internationally, establishing a body of work whose combination of extremity and intimacy is singular in the history of performance. In 1996 she completed two important theatre pieces, Biography and Delusional, and the following year her controversial performance Balkan Baroque won the International Venice Biennale Award. She received the Niedersächsicher Kunstpreis as well as the New York Dance and Performance Award for her recent performance/exhibition The House with the Ocean View at the Sean Kelly Gallery. For her November 2005 exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Pure Raw: Performance, Pedagogy, and (Re)presentation

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2005 Chris Thompson and Katarina Weslien
Subject
Interview
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028106775329660
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PURE RAW Performance, Pedagogy, and (Re)presentation Marina Abramovic; interviewed by Chris Thompson and Katarina Weslien M arina Abramovic; has been pushing the limits of performance for over three decades. From 1965–70 she studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade, and soon after that at the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, where she later taught. In 1970 she began working with sound environments, film, video, and performance. Five years later she met the artist Ulay (Uwe Laysiepen) in Amsterdam, with whom she worked until 1988. Together they devised performances that centered on the limits of human endurance, consciousness, and perception. Working independently since then, she has exhibited, performed, and taught internationally, establishing a body of work whose combination of extremity and intimacy is singular in the history of performance. In 1996 she completed two important theatre pieces, Biography and Delusional, and the following year her controversial performance Balkan Baroque won the International Venice Biennale Award. She received the Niedersächsicher Kunstpreis as well as the New York Dance and Performance Award for her recent performance/exhibition The House with the Ocean View at the Sean Kelly Gallery. For her November 2005 exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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