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Peter Handke and the Language of War

Peter Handke and the Language of War Peter Handke and tHe Language of War Scott abbott The history of this war hasn’t been written yet. It is offensive to be labeled a revisionist because of this statement. With the exception of the Shoah, the writing of history is never final, especially in the Balkans. Peter Handke, Interview with Antoine de Gaudemar, Liberation, March 27,1997 P eter Handke’s Die Fahrt im Einbaum (Voyage by Dugout) premiered at Vienna’s Burgtheater on June 9, 1999, the day NATO representatives announced that their seventy-eight-day bombing of Yugoslavia would cease. Claus Peymann directed the play, his last production at the Burgtheater after thirteen high-profile years. Two months earlier, in protest of Vatican and German support for NATO intervention in the war, Handke had renounced his membership in the Catholic Church and had returned the ten thousand Marks awarded him in 1973 for Germany’s Büchner Prize. There had been rumors that Handke would withdraw his play in protest of the bombing and that protestors would disturb the premiere of a play they found “pro-Serbian.” The play opened as scheduled, to a packed house and largely appreciative audience. Many of Europe’s newspapers reviewed the play the next morning, including four in Berlin; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Peter Handke and the Language of War

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 34 (2) – May 1, 2012

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2012 Scott Abbott
Subject
Play
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00093
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Peter Handke and tHe Language of War Scott abbott The history of this war hasn’t been written yet. It is offensive to be labeled a revisionist because of this statement. With the exception of the Shoah, the writing of history is never final, especially in the Balkans. Peter Handke, Interview with Antoine de Gaudemar, Liberation, March 27,1997 P eter Handke’s Die Fahrt im Einbaum (Voyage by Dugout) premiered at Vienna’s Burgtheater on June 9, 1999, the day NATO representatives announced that their seventy-eight-day bombing of Yugoslavia would cease. Claus Peymann directed the play, his last production at the Burgtheater after thirteen high-profile years. Two months earlier, in protest of Vatican and German support for NATO intervention in the war, Handke had renounced his membership in the Catholic Church and had returned the ten thousand Marks awarded him in 1973 for Germany’s Büchner Prize. There had been rumors that Handke would withdraw his play in protest of the bombing and that protestors would disturb the premiere of a play they found “pro-Serbian.” The play opened as scheduled, to a packed house and largely appreciative audience. Many of Europe’s newspapers reviewed the play the next morning, including four in Berlin;

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2012

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