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On Pierre Bourdieu: Three Responses

On Pierre Bourdieu: Three Responses On Pierre Bourdieu: Three Responses Pierre Bourdieu, one of the leading French intellectuals of the last twentyfive years, died on January 23, 2002, at the age of seventy one. Bourdieu, who was chair of sociology at the Collège de France and who taught at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, was the author of twenty-five books, many of which have been translated into English, including: The State Nobility: Elite Schools in the Field of Power, Homo Academicus, Pascalian Meditations, and On Television. Probably his most influential work was Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, published in France in 1979 and in the United States in 1984, which brought to the attention of an international audience his ideas about the powerful effects of class and other distinctions in contemporary societies. In the last decade of his life, he also gained notoriety in France as a leading critic of globalization. Due to the influence of his work on contemporary artistic practice and theory, October is publishing the following group of commemorative essays. —The Editors OCTOBER 101, Summer 2002, p. 3. © 2002 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

On Pierre Bourdieu: Three Responses

October , Volume Summer 2002 (101) – Jul 1, 2002

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2002 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/016228702320275427
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On Pierre Bourdieu: Three Responses Pierre Bourdieu, one of the leading French intellectuals of the last twentyfive years, died on January 23, 2002, at the age of seventy one. Bourdieu, who was chair of sociology at the Collège de France and who taught at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, was the author of twenty-five books, many of which have been translated into English, including: The State Nobility: Elite Schools in the Field of Power, Homo Academicus, Pascalian Meditations, and On Television. Probably his most influential work was Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, published in France in 1979 and in the United States in 1984, which brought to the attention of an international audience his ideas about the powerful effects of class and other distinctions in contemporary societies. In the last decade of his life, he also gained notoriety in France as a leading critic of globalization. Due to the influence of his work on contemporary artistic practice and theory, October is publishing the following group of commemorative essays. —The Editors OCTOBER 101, Summer 2002, p. 3. © 2002 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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