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Music on a Long Thin Wire

Music on a Long Thin Wire IntroductIon on-LIne SuppLement Lucier Celebration he articles in this on-line supplement are drawn from a symposium [1] presented in November 2011 at Wesleyan University as part of a celebration of Alvin Lucier’s work as a composer and teacher. The symposium was structured as three panels focused on his instrumental works since 1984 (Notations), his electronic works since 1965 (Processes) and his early work as a conductor, performer, and composer (Performance). A particular goal was to explore the connections between his electronic and instrumental music. Both Nicolas Collins and Richard Lerman were careful to point to the central role of listening in Lucier’s approach to live electronic music. Typically, those pieces arose from “extramusical” ideas (brain waves, echolocation, room resonance), a process Andrew Dewar termed “recontextualization” or “cross-domain mapping.” A crucial property of this approach is that the mappings into sound seek an immediate aural encounter with the generative idea, eschewing conventional musical structures as distractions. For example, the brain waves of Music for Solo Performer are not treated as an objet sonore for manipulation but as an immediate physical reality at the moment of performance. Consequently, each of these pieces begin from scratch as a trial-and-error process of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Music on a Long Thin Wire

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2012 (22) – Dec 1, 2012

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2012 ISAST
Subject
On-Line Supplement: Lucier Celebration
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/LMJ_a_00110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductIon on-LIne SuppLement Lucier Celebration he articles in this on-line supplement are drawn from a symposium [1] presented in November 2011 at Wesleyan University as part of a celebration of Alvin Lucier’s work as a composer and teacher. The symposium was structured as three panels focused on his instrumental works since 1984 (Notations), his electronic works since 1965 (Processes) and his early work as a conductor, performer, and composer (Performance). A particular goal was to explore the connections between his electronic and instrumental music. Both Nicolas Collins and Richard Lerman were careful to point to the central role of listening in Lucier’s approach to live electronic music. Typically, those pieces arose from “extramusical” ideas (brain waves, echolocation, room resonance), a process Andrew Dewar termed “recontextualization” or “cross-domain mapping.” A crucial property of this approach is that the mappings into sound seek an immediate aural encounter with the generative idea, eschewing conventional musical structures as distractions. For example, the brain waves of Music for Solo Performer are not treated as an objet sonore for manipulation but as an immediate physical reality at the moment of performance. Consequently, each of these pieces begin from scratch as a trial-and-error process of

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2012

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