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Marina Abramovic on the Ledge

Marina Abramovic on the Ledge ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Marina Abramovic in her performance The House with the Ocean View, 2002. Photo: Courtesy Steven P. Harris and Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. MARINA ABRAMOVIC ON THE LEDGE Johannes Birringer Marina Abramovic, The House with the Ocean View, Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, November 15–December 21, 2002; living installation: November 15–26, 2002. or many years, Marina Abramovic has been a prominent practitioner of site-specific action and performance art, and like some of the other pioneer women in body art (Carolee Schneemann, Yoko Ono, Valie Export, Ana Mendieta, Lygia Clark), she had used her body deliberately—to expose it to certain pressures, dangers, and contingencies, or to present it, make it present, as subject and object in specific relationships to the world. During the 1970s and 1980s, when she performed together with her partner Ulay (Uwe Laysiepen), these actions were both intensely relational and durational. In Nightsea Crossing she sat motionless and silent for seven hours at one end of a long table, facing Ulay. In Relation in Space, performed at the Venice Biennale in 1976, their naked bodies crashed into each other repeatedly for one hour. The catalog described the action bluntly as a task: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
Subject
Art & Performance Notes
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103321781565
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Marina Abramovic in her performance The House with the Ocean View, 2002. Photo: Courtesy Steven P. Harris and Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. MARINA ABRAMOVIC ON THE LEDGE Johannes Birringer Marina Abramovic, The House with the Ocean View, Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, November 15–December 21, 2002; living installation: November 15–26, 2002. or many years, Marina Abramovic has been a prominent practitioner of site-specific action and performance art, and like some of the other pioneer women in body art (Carolee Schneemann, Yoko Ono, Valie Export, Ana Mendieta, Lygia Clark), she had used her body deliberately—to expose it to certain pressures, dangers, and contingencies, or to present it, make it present, as subject and object in specific relationships to the world. During the 1970s and 1980s, when she performed together with her partner Ulay (Uwe Laysiepen), these actions were both intensely relational and durational. In Nightsea Crossing she sat motionless and silent for seven hours at one end of a long table, facing Ulay. In Relation in Space, performed at the Venice Biennale in 1976, their naked bodies crashed into each other repeatedly for one hour. The catalog described the action bluntly as a task:

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2003

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