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Long Distance Performance: Autobiography and Globalization

Long Distance Performance: Autobiography and Globalization LONG DISTANCE PERFORMANCE Autobiography and Globalization Lee Rodney ime was a defining preoccupation in the art of the 1960s and 1970s. In retrospect, much of the work from that period seems painfully slow, out of step with the speed of images in contemporary culture. This obsession with duration was often articulated through self-representation: appointments with the video camera that were exceptionally long; or frequent and punctual, daily photo sessions that documented the passage of time through the mundane details of everyday activities. The early works of artists as diverse as Bill Viola, Martha Rosler, and Tehching Hsieh are situated engagements with the camera. While the location is often secondary, these temporal studies had a geographic or architectural frame, be it a city, a house, an apartment, or a cage. The work of On Kawara and Bas Jan Ader, two artists of the same generation who share a similar preoccupation with time, is a significant departure from time-based art of that period. Whereas much of the work from the 1970s located temporality in a space or a body, Kawara’s and Ader’s practices take up time through travel, challenging conventions of autobiography by measuring their lives through movement. Their autobiographical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Long Distance Performance: Autobiography and Globalization

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 34 (2) – May 1, 2012

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2012 Lee Rodney
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00090
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LONG DISTANCE PERFORMANCE Autobiography and Globalization Lee Rodney ime was a defining preoccupation in the art of the 1960s and 1970s. In retrospect, much of the work from that period seems painfully slow, out of step with the speed of images in contemporary culture. This obsession with duration was often articulated through self-representation: appointments with the video camera that were exceptionally long; or frequent and punctual, daily photo sessions that documented the passage of time through the mundane details of everyday activities. The early works of artists as diverse as Bill Viola, Martha Rosler, and Tehching Hsieh are situated engagements with the camera. While the location is often secondary, these temporal studies had a geographic or architectural frame, be it a city, a house, an apartment, or a cage. The work of On Kawara and Bas Jan Ader, two artists of the same generation who share a similar preoccupation with time, is a significant departure from time-based art of that period. Whereas much of the work from the 1970s located temporality in a space or a body, Kawara’s and Ader’s practices take up time through travel, challenging conventions of autobiography by measuring their lives through movement. Their autobiographical

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2012

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