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John Cage and Recording

John Cage and Recording There is general agreement that John Cage's attitude toward records and recording was ambiguous and not necessarily coherent. However, if one closely analyzes his work and his evolution of the concept of the art—that is, from his pieces for prepared piano to his use of the I Ching for Music of Changes to 4′33′′ to his prototype of Happenings at Black Mountain College in 1952—one finds a critique of something that other composers take as self-evident. Cage's critique of recording relates to the representation as re-presentation of music. The author aims in this article to discover/uncover Cage's critique of the metaphysics of presence through his work and utterances. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

John Cage and Recording

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2003 (13) – Dec 1, 2003

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 ISAST
Subject
Articles; Groove, Pit and Wave: Recording, Transmission and Music
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/096112104322750728
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is general agreement that John Cage's attitude toward records and recording was ambiguous and not necessarily coherent. However, if one closely analyzes his work and his evolution of the concept of the art—that is, from his pieces for prepared piano to his use of the I Ching for Music of Changes to 4′33′′ to his prototype of Happenings at Black Mountain College in 1952—one finds a critique of something that other composers take as self-evident. Cage's critique of recording relates to the representation as re-presentation of music. The author aims in this article to discover/uncover Cage's critique of the metaphysics of presence through his work and utterances.

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2003

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