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Introduction: LMJ10: Southern Cones

Introduction: LMJ10: Southern Cones INTRODUCTION LMJ10: Southern Cones o place is exotic if that is where you happen to live, as any expatriate knows after the second year. Paris, Beirut, Quito, Kinshasa—some are hardship posts, some are plum, but life always seems to come down to the same basic questions: “Can I get to the store before it closes?” “How are the schools?” “Anything good on?” But the ease of transition from the A&P to Sainsbury’s to Aldi to Almac is not always mirrored in the cultural arena, and the globalization of historically Eurocentric cultural artifacts is a tricky business: the electronic music of a Colombian composer I know has been criticized by a German composer I know as sounding “too European . . . not ‘Latin’ enough.” Such criticisms, while perhaps founded in admirable worries about the dread tread of Euro-American cultural imperialism, betray a decidedly touristic taste for the exotic. There is more to cultural heritage and geographical placement than funny sleeves and funky rhythms, after all. Colombians own Japanese synthesizers and Chinese bootleg CDs of American musicians playing European music, but music by a Colombian composer is—by definition— more authentically “Latin” than that made by a European owning maracas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Introduction: LMJ10: Southern Cones

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2000 (10) – Dec 1, 2000

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2000 ISAST
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/096112100570440
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION LMJ10: Southern Cones o place is exotic if that is where you happen to live, as any expatriate knows after the second year. Paris, Beirut, Quito, Kinshasa—some are hardship posts, some are plum, but life always seems to come down to the same basic questions: “Can I get to the store before it closes?” “How are the schools?” “Anything good on?” But the ease of transition from the A&P to Sainsbury’s to Aldi to Almac is not always mirrored in the cultural arena, and the globalization of historically Eurocentric cultural artifacts is a tricky business: the electronic music of a Colombian composer I know has been criticized by a German composer I know as sounding “too European . . . not ‘Latin’ enough.” Such criticisms, while perhaps founded in admirable worries about the dread tread of Euro-American cultural imperialism, betray a decidedly touristic taste for the exotic. There is more to cultural heritage and geographical placement than funny sleeves and funky rhythms, after all. Colombians own Japanese synthesizers and Chinese bootleg CDs of American musicians playing European music, but music by a Colombian composer is—by definition— more authentically “Latin” than that made by a European owning maracas

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.