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Identity and Intimacy in Human-Computer Improvisation

Identity and Intimacy in Human-Computer Improvisation On-Line SuppLement The following are short Abstracts of articles that can be viewed in full online. See for the full articles, as well as sound files and supplemental materials related to the rest of the journal and CD. Christopher Lee, 127 W. Fairfield Drive, Claremont, CA 91711, U.S.A. E-mail: . Matthew Lake, 60 E. 1st Street, #2A, New York, NY 10003, U.S.A. E-mail: . Inspired by two early works of Karlheinz Stockhausen, the authors visualize tonal and rhythmic sonic principles utilized by the composer in the pieces Elektronische Musik Studie II and Kontakte. Recognizing frequency as an objective attribute of sonic structure, our studies were inspired by the notions of perceptual rhythm and pitch manipulation present in Kontakte and generative material aspects of additive synthesis explored in Elektronische Musik Studie II. Approaching this topic with backgrounds in architecture, the authors have interests largely in visualizing the nested spatial and phenomenal potentials of the works. visation. Later in the article, the author describes the potential uses of technology that provide alternative possibilities for solo improvisation as well as alternative channels for participation in the act of improvising, widening the experience of shared control in collective improvisation. muSicaL imprOviSatiOn in pOSt-Literate SOciety Vincent Cee, University of Alaska Fairbanks, P.O. Box 755660, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5660, U.S.A. E-mail: . The author asks the reader to consider to what extent Western culture has shed a literate-linear rational positivist worldview, while advancing an electronically mediated post-literate society aligned with Marshall McLuhan’s aural-acoustic Global Village. The author proposes that a post-literate society not only yields fertile ground for improvisation of all kinds, but such a society, similar to pre-literate societies depends heavily on improvisation for meaning making in place of reliance on capital “T” Truth. a view On imprOviSatiOn frOm the Kitchen SinK Dafna Naphtali, 62 Dupont Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222, U.S.A. E-mail: . Hans Tammen, 62 Dupont Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222, U.S.A. E-mail: . The authors elaborate on their individual approaches to improvising, music and technology, and how their approaches have been influenced by their history as musicians. They describe the evolution of their software programming for Naphtali’s interactive processed sound/noise system and Tammen’s hybrid instrument the Endangered Guitar. imprOviSatiOn meLODy graphS Leonardo Peusner, Arenales 3654, Mar del Plata, Argentina. E-mail: . The author presents a graph approach for the analysis and synthesis of improvisation lines. The method constitutes a blueprinting technique that allows the application of a mathematical framework to musical aesthetics. imprOviSing with SpatiaL mOtiOn: mixing the DigitaL muSic enSembLe Joanne Cannon and Stuart Favilla, Bent Leather Band, 1666 Main Road, Christmas Hills VIC3775, Australia. E-mail: . The authors present research undertaken by the Bent Leather Band investigating the application of live Ambisonics to large digital-instrument ensemble improvisation. Their playable approach to live ambisonic projection is inspired by the work of Trevor Wishart and presents a systematic investigation of the potential for live spatial motion improvisation. iDentity anD intimacy in human-cOmputer imprOviSatiOn Michael Young, Music Department, Goldsmiths, University of London, U.K. E-mail: . Artificial intelligence invites a new approach to computing in live music performance. Computers and human performers might collaborate on an equal basis. The perceived identities of participants, both human and machine, are enriched but problematic. The conflicting relationships between these identities impact upon both performers’ and listeners’ experience. The film Orlacs Hände is a starting point for a speculative discussion about humancomputer improvisation, problems of identity, the self and the Other, social intimacy and the therapeutic process. expLOring nOtiOnS Of cOntrOL/interactiOn in imprOviSatiOn practiceS Koray Tahiroglu, Department of Media, ˘ P.O. Box 31000, School of Art and Design, Aalto University, 00076 Aalto, Finland. E-mail: . Web: . The author discusses his LiveImprovS~ and Call in the Dark Noise performances, investigating experimental improvisation as a performance practice with sonic and technological exploration. Through these performances, he introduces notions of control and interaction in solo and collective impro- pitch tO rhythm :: rhythm tO pitch Andrew Lucia, 2126 Locust Street, Apartment 3R, Philadelphia, PA 19103, U.S.A. E-mail: . On-Line Supplement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Identity and Intimacy in Human-Computer Improvisation

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2010 (20) – Dec 1, 2010

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2010 ISAST
Subject
On-Line Supplement Section
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/LMJ_a_00022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On-Line SuppLement The following are short Abstracts of articles that can be viewed in full online. See for the full articles, as well as sound files and supplemental materials related to the rest of the journal and CD. Christopher Lee, 127 W. Fairfield Drive, Claremont, CA 91711, U.S.A. E-mail: . Matthew Lake, 60 E. 1st Street, #2A, New York, NY 10003, U.S.A. E-mail: . Inspired by two early works of Karlheinz Stockhausen, the authors visualize tonal and rhythmic sonic principles utilized by the composer in the pieces Elektronische Musik Studie II and Kontakte. Recognizing frequency as an objective attribute of sonic structure, our studies were inspired by the notions of perceptual rhythm and pitch manipulation present in Kontakte and generative material aspects of additive synthesis explored in Elektronische Musik Studie II. Approaching this topic with backgrounds in architecture, the authors have interests largely in visualizing the nested spatial and phenomenal potentials of the works. visation. Later in the article, the author describes the potential uses of technology that provide alternative possibilities for solo improvisation as well as alternative channels for participation in the act of improvising, widening the experience of shared control in collective improvisation. muSicaL imprOviSatiOn in pOSt-Literate SOciety Vincent Cee, University of Alaska Fairbanks, P.O. Box 755660, Fairbanks, AK 99775-5660, U.S.A. E-mail: . The author asks the reader to consider to what extent Western culture has shed a literate-linear rational positivist worldview, while advancing an electronically mediated post-literate society aligned with Marshall McLuhan’s aural-acoustic Global Village. The author proposes that a post-literate society not only yields fertile ground for improvisation of all kinds, but such a society, similar to pre-literate societies depends heavily on improvisation for meaning making in place of reliance on capital “T” Truth. a view On imprOviSatiOn frOm the Kitchen SinK Dafna Naphtali, 62 Dupont Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222, U.S.A. E-mail: . Hans Tammen, 62 Dupont Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222, U.S.A. E-mail: . The authors elaborate on their individual approaches to improvising, music and technology, and how their approaches have been influenced by their history as musicians. They describe the evolution of their software programming for Naphtali’s interactive processed sound/noise system and Tammen’s hybrid instrument the Endangered Guitar. imprOviSatiOn meLODy graphS Leonardo Peusner, Arenales 3654, Mar del Plata, Argentina. E-mail: . The author presents a graph approach for the analysis and synthesis of improvisation lines. The method constitutes a blueprinting technique that allows the application of a mathematical framework to musical aesthetics. imprOviSing with SpatiaL mOtiOn: mixing the DigitaL muSic enSembLe Joanne Cannon and Stuart Favilla, Bent Leather Band, 1666 Main Road, Christmas Hills VIC3775, Australia. E-mail: . The authors present research undertaken by the Bent Leather Band investigating the application of live Ambisonics to large digital-instrument ensemble improvisation. Their playable approach to live ambisonic projection is inspired by the work of Trevor Wishart and presents a systematic investigation of the potential for live spatial motion improvisation. iDentity anD intimacy in human-cOmputer imprOviSatiOn Michael Young, Music Department, Goldsmiths, University of London, U.K. E-mail: . Artificial intelligence invites a new approach to computing in live music performance. Computers and human performers might collaborate on an equal basis. The perceived identities of participants, both human and machine, are enriched but problematic. The conflicting relationships between these identities impact upon both performers’ and listeners’ experience. The film Orlacs Hände is a starting point for a speculative discussion about humancomputer improvisation, problems of identity, the self and the Other, social intimacy and the therapeutic process. expLOring nOtiOnS Of cOntrOL/interactiOn in imprOviSatiOn practiceS Koray Tahiroglu, Department of Media, ˘ P.O. Box 31000, School of Art and Design, Aalto University, 00076 Aalto, Finland. E-mail: . Web: . The author discusses his LiveImprovS~ and Call in the Dark Noise performances, investigating experimental improvisation as a performance practice with sonic and technological exploration. Through these performances, he introduces notions of control and interaction in solo and collective impro- pitch tO rhythm :: rhythm tO pitch Andrew Lucia, 2126 Locust Street, Apartment 3R, Philadelphia, PA 19103, U.S.A. E-mail: . On-Line Supplement

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2010

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