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Groove, Pit and Wave

Groove, Pit and Wave LMJ13_01int_001-002 11/25/03 2:58 PM Page 1 INTRODUCTION Groove, Pit and Wave espite the Comet Kahoutek–like anticlimax of Y2K, the rollover of the millennial odometer was accompanied by dramatic reports of one apparently earthshaking transformation of our culture. The salient fact byte, repeated in mainstream and music presses, web sites and even the odd Ph.D. dissertation, was that in 1999 more turntables were sold than guitars [1]. The news was all the more notable as it came at a time when the vinyl LP had been almost universally supplanted by the CD as a format for the distribution and consumption of music. These turntables were not purchased to be stockpiled by the few remaining vinyl purists in anticipation of future shortages; they were bought by disc jockeys. They were not bought in order to listen to records, but to perform records. Many hours spent revving my surf engine have yet to yield an authoritative primary source, nor indeed any evidence to raise the status of this statistic above urban legend. But whether or not this fact is fiction, all the popular willingness to accept it reveals a fundamental change in public attitude as to what constitutes a musical instrument. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Groove, Pit and Wave

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2003 (13) – Dec 1, 2003

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 ISAST
Subject
Introduction; Groove, Pit and Wave: Recording, Transmission and Music
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/096112104322750700
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LMJ13_01int_001-002 11/25/03 2:58 PM Page 1 INTRODUCTION Groove, Pit and Wave espite the Comet Kahoutek–like anticlimax of Y2K, the rollover of the millennial odometer was accompanied by dramatic reports of one apparently earthshaking transformation of our culture. The salient fact byte, repeated in mainstream and music presses, web sites and even the odd Ph.D. dissertation, was that in 1999 more turntables were sold than guitars [1]. The news was all the more notable as it came at a time when the vinyl LP had been almost universally supplanted by the CD as a format for the distribution and consumption of music. These turntables were not purchased to be stockpiled by the few remaining vinyl purists in anticipation of future shortages; they were bought by disc jockeys. They were not bought in order to listen to records, but to perform records. Many hours spent revving my surf engine have yet to yield an authoritative primary source, nor indeed any evidence to raise the status of this statistic above urban legend. But whether or not this fact is fiction, all the popular willingness to accept it reveals a fundamental change in public attitude as to what constitutes a musical instrument.

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2003

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