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Forgetting History: Report from Berlin/Theatertreffen 2018

Forgetting History: Report from Berlin/Theatertreffen 2018 Forgetting History Report from Berlin/Theatertreffen 2018 Paul David Young ven as it re-emerges as the capital of reunited Germany and as an inter- national hub of contemporary culture, Berlin has taken pains to preserve Eand commemorate its traumatic history. The ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm Gedächtniskirche on the Kurfürstendamm display the devastation of war. In a project begun by Gunter Demnig in 1992, the Stolpersteine, small brass memo- rials with the names and ultimate fates of victims of the Holocaust and other Nazi violence, are inlaid in front of the homes in which the victims had lived in Berlin. The Jewish Museum, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, the Wall Museum, the City Museum Berlin, the DDR Museum, Christian Boltanski’s Missing House, and countless other sites insist upon historical memory. Having learned the hard way, the Germans are exceptionally aware of history. Still, in the middle of attending Theatertreffen 2018 (the fifty-fifth roundup of the ten best German-language theatre productions of the past year, which are restaged in Berlin for the festival), I was startled to see on German television a report about the Alternative für Deutschland, the neo-fascist political party that gained representation in the Bundestag in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Forgetting History: Report from Berlin/Theatertreffen 2018

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 40 (3): 9 – Sep 1, 2018

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
Copyright © MIT Press
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj_a_00438
Publisher site
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Abstract

Forgetting History Report from Berlin/Theatertreffen 2018 Paul David Young ven as it re-emerges as the capital of reunited Germany and as an inter- national hub of contemporary culture, Berlin has taken pains to preserve Eand commemorate its traumatic history. The ruins of the Kaiser Wilhelm Gedächtniskirche on the Kurfürstendamm display the devastation of war. In a project begun by Gunter Demnig in 1992, the Stolpersteine, small brass memo- rials with the names and ultimate fates of victims of the Holocaust and other Nazi violence, are inlaid in front of the homes in which the victims had lived in Berlin. The Jewish Museum, Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, the Wall Museum, the City Museum Berlin, the DDR Museum, Christian Boltanski’s Missing House, and countless other sites insist upon historical memory. Having learned the hard way, the Germans are exceptionally aware of history. Still, in the middle of attending Theatertreffen 2018 (the fifty-fifth roundup of the ten best German-language theatre productions of the past year, which are restaged in Berlin for the festival), I was startled to see on German television a report about the Alternative für Deutschland, the neo-fascist political party that gained representation in the Bundestag in

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2018

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