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Filming Israel: A Conversation

Filming Israel: A Conversation Filming Israel: A Conversation AMOS GITAI and ANNETTE MICHELSON Amos Gitai, the preeminent Israeli filmmaker of his generation, is the author of thirtyseven films. Trained as an architect in Israel and at Berkeley, he turned in 1980 to filmmaking for reasons set forth in the following portion of conversations held in New York in 2000. The radically critical dimension of his investigation of Israel’s policy on the Palestinian question generated an immediate response of alarm, hostility, and censorship. Although the corpus of Gitai’s work is large and extremely varied, including documentary films shot in the Far East, the Philippines, France, Germany, Italy, and elsewhere, it is largely the transition from work in the documentary mode to that of the fiction feature film that has, as might be expected, enlarged the appreciative audience of his work. If in these talks we concentrated on the work of that transitional period, it was because as our talks progressed it became apparent that this allowed us to define issues and raise questions central to an understanding of his enterprise. At the time of our discussions, the negotiations between the Israelis and Palestinians were proceeding under the sponsorship of the Clinton regime, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

Filming Israel: A Conversation

October , Volume Fall 2001 (98) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2001 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/octo.2001.98.1.47
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Filming Israel: A Conversation AMOS GITAI and ANNETTE MICHELSON Amos Gitai, the preeminent Israeli filmmaker of his generation, is the author of thirtyseven films. Trained as an architect in Israel and at Berkeley, he turned in 1980 to filmmaking for reasons set forth in the following portion of conversations held in New York in 2000. The radically critical dimension of his investigation of Israel’s policy on the Palestinian question generated an immediate response of alarm, hostility, and censorship. Although the corpus of Gitai’s work is large and extremely varied, including documentary films shot in the Far East, the Philippines, France, Germany, Italy, and elsewhere, it is largely the transition from work in the documentary mode to that of the fiction feature film that has, as might be expected, enlarged the appreciative audience of his work. If in these talks we concentrated on the work of that transitional period, it was because as our talks progressed it became apparent that this allowed us to define issues and raise questions central to an understanding of his enterprise. At the time of our discussions, the negotiations between the Israelis and Palestinians were proceeding under the sponsorship of the Clinton regime, and

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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