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Everyday Miracles: The Videos of Oliver Herring

Everyday Miracles: The Videos of Oliver Herring EVERYDAY MIRACLES The Videos of Oliver Herring Elisabeth Kley Oliver Herring, Little Dances of Misfortunes, Max Protetch Gallery, New York, February 21–March 23, 2002. erched on a ladder, Oliver Herring asks a few friends to lie down on a carpet of phosphorescent cardboard and pretend to walk. He turns out the light and films a few seconds of video. Lights back on, his performers awkwardly shift to prepare for the next shot. An hour of incremental progress is needed for a moment in which human bodies resting on the floor become black silhouettes leaping in the air, freed from gravity, against a background of pale iridescent green. Creating movement from stillness, weightlessness from weight, Herring is a specialist of transformation. His first exhibited work was a memorial for Ethyl Eichelberger, the drag performer who committed suicide in 1991 after being diagnosed with AIDS. An enormous flower made from transparent mylar tape was anchored to the walls of a room with wire, like a blown-up blossom from a funeral bouquet prevented from flying out of this world. A poignant echo of Eichelberger’s raucously colorful presence, the flower united a stripped-down aesthetic of mourning P with the glittering reflectiveness of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Everyday Miracles: The Videos of Oliver Herring

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 25 (2) – May 1, 2003

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103321781583
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EVERYDAY MIRACLES The Videos of Oliver Herring Elisabeth Kley Oliver Herring, Little Dances of Misfortunes, Max Protetch Gallery, New York, February 21–March 23, 2002. erched on a ladder, Oliver Herring asks a few friends to lie down on a carpet of phosphorescent cardboard and pretend to walk. He turns out the light and films a few seconds of video. Lights back on, his performers awkwardly shift to prepare for the next shot. An hour of incremental progress is needed for a moment in which human bodies resting on the floor become black silhouettes leaping in the air, freed from gravity, against a background of pale iridescent green. Creating movement from stillness, weightlessness from weight, Herring is a specialist of transformation. His first exhibited work was a memorial for Ethyl Eichelberger, the drag performer who committed suicide in 1991 after being diagnosed with AIDS. An enormous flower made from transparent mylar tape was anchored to the walls of a room with wire, like a blown-up blossom from a funeral bouquet prevented from flying out of this world. A poignant echo of Eichelberger’s raucously colorful presence, the flower united a stripped-down aesthetic of mourning P with the glittering reflectiveness of

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2003

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