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Eavesdropping, Surveillance, and Sound

Eavesdropping, Surveillance, and Sound ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Ron Athey at the National Review of Live Art, 2005. Photo: Courtesy NRLA. EAVESDROPPING, SURVEILLANCE, AND SOUND Paige McGinley Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Cabin Fever, an exhibition at Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York, February 10–March 20, 2004. I pick up the pair of headphones and put them on. A wooden rect angular structure, the size of a refrigerator, sits atop four legs in the center of an otherwise empty room. One of the faces is open: not wood, but velvety curtains. Gingerly, I part the curtains and put my head inside the enormous box. Inside, there is a diorama, with a sense of perspective that feels somehow falsely deep. The diorama is a miniature representation of a familiar rural scene: a trailer home, leaves on the ground, trees, a gravel driveway. It is night. Someone is home. The lights are on inside and there is the unmistakable blue flicker of a television screen. As I watch intently, the sound score begins to intrude, interrupting my looking. The sounds of a quiet summer night: crickets, leaves rustling, the murmur of activity in the house. The sound of car wheels on gravel draws my http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Eavesdropping, Surveillance, and Sound

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 28 (1) – Jan 1, 2006

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2005 Paige McGinley
Subject
Art & Performance Notes
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028106775329642
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Ron Athey at the National Review of Live Art, 2005. Photo: Courtesy NRLA. EAVESDROPPING, SURVEILLANCE, AND SOUND Paige McGinley Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Cabin Fever, an exhibition at Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York, February 10–March 20, 2004. I pick up the pair of headphones and put them on. A wooden rect angular structure, the size of a refrigerator, sits atop four legs in the center of an otherwise empty room. One of the faces is open: not wood, but velvety curtains. Gingerly, I part the curtains and put my head inside the enormous box. Inside, there is a diorama, with a sense of perspective that feels somehow falsely deep. The diorama is a miniature representation of a familiar rural scene: a trailer home, leaves on the ground, trees, a gravel driveway. It is night. Someone is home. The lights are on inside and there is the unmistakable blue flicker of a television screen. As I watch intently, the sound score begins to intrude, interrupting my looking. The sounds of a quiet summer night: crickets, leaves rustling, the murmur of activity in the house. The sound of car wheels on gravel draws my

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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