Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Double Exposure

Double Exposure DOUBLE EXPOSURE Ryan M. Davis Vieux Carré, written by Tennessee Williams, directed by Elizabeth LeCompte, The Wooster Group, Baryshnikov Arts Center, New York, February 2–March 13, 2011. he Wooster Group has been staging memory plays for thirty years. In the mid-seventies, autobiographical remembrances from founding member Spalding Gray’s formative years—particularly the trauma of his mother’s suicide—provided the theatre company with raw material for its inaugural creations, Sakonnet Point and Rumstick Road. At the same time as they embodied Gray’s family reminiscences, these early works also probed memory’s unintentional, but nevertheless pernicious, tendency to degrade its object’s complexity. As Gray and Elizabeth LeCompte insisted, “it’s really about us thinking about the past.”1 Later performances, such as Route 1 & 9 and L.S.D. (. . . Just the High Points . . .), revealed the violence at work in the broad cultural memory enshrined in American literary “classics.” These pieces, wrought from the wisdom that every act of remembering is likewise an act of forgetting, attended to the racial, sexual, and political experiences that the canon elides. And throughout the years, the Group’s T deployment of the media technologies that quietly condition our everyday perceptions has reminded audiences that even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/double-exposure-IPUfEtCgil
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2012 Ryan M. Davis
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00092
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DOUBLE EXPOSURE Ryan M. Davis Vieux Carré, written by Tennessee Williams, directed by Elizabeth LeCompte, The Wooster Group, Baryshnikov Arts Center, New York, February 2–March 13, 2011. he Wooster Group has been staging memory plays for thirty years. In the mid-seventies, autobiographical remembrances from founding member Spalding Gray’s formative years—particularly the trauma of his mother’s suicide—provided the theatre company with raw material for its inaugural creations, Sakonnet Point and Rumstick Road. At the same time as they embodied Gray’s family reminiscences, these early works also probed memory’s unintentional, but nevertheless pernicious, tendency to degrade its object’s complexity. As Gray and Elizabeth LeCompte insisted, “it’s really about us thinking about the past.”1 Later performances, such as Route 1 & 9 and L.S.D. (. . . Just the High Points . . .), revealed the violence at work in the broad cultural memory enshrined in American literary “classics.” These pieces, wrought from the wisdom that every act of remembering is likewise an act of forgetting, attended to the racial, sexual, and political experiences that the canon elides. And throughout the years, the Group’s T deployment of the media technologies that quietly condition our everyday perceptions has reminded audiences that even

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.