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Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science

Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science 08 Cross 5/20/01 10:59 PM Page 49 Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science Nigel Cross Design and Science This is a revised version of a paper prepared I would like to begin this paper with a brief review of some of the for the Design+Research Symposium held at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, May 2000. historical concerns that have emerged with respect to the relation- ship between design and science. These concerns emerged strongly at two important periods in the modern history of design: in the 1920s, with a search for scientific design products, and in the 1960s, with a concern for scientific design process. The 40-year cycle in these concerns appears to be coming around again, and we might expect to see the reemergence of design-science concerns in the 2000s. A desire to “scientise” design can be traced back to ideas in the twentieth century modern movement of design. For example, in the early 1920s, the De Stijl protagonist, Theo van Doesburg, expressed his perception of a new spirit in art and design: “Our epoch is hostile to every subjective speculation in art, science, tech- nology, etc. The new spirit, which already governs almost all http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Design Issues MIT Press

Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science

Design Issues , Volume 17 (3): 7 – Jul 1, 2001

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References (25)

Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2001 Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0747-9360
eISSN
1531-4790
DOI
10.1162/074793601750357196
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

08 Cross 5/20/01 10:59 PM Page 49 Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline Versus Design Science Nigel Cross Design and Science This is a revised version of a paper prepared I would like to begin this paper with a brief review of some of the for the Design+Research Symposium held at the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, May 2000. historical concerns that have emerged with respect to the relation- ship between design and science. These concerns emerged strongly at two important periods in the modern history of design: in the 1920s, with a search for scientific design products, and in the 1960s, with a concern for scientific design process. The 40-year cycle in these concerns appears to be coming around again, and we might expect to see the reemergence of design-science concerns in the 2000s. A desire to “scientise” design can be traced back to ideas in the twentieth century modern movement of design. For example, in the early 1920s, the De Stijl protagonist, Theo van Doesburg, expressed his perception of a new spirit in art and design: “Our epoch is hostile to every subjective speculation in art, science, tech- nology, etc. The new spirit, which already governs almost all

Journal

Design IssuesMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2001

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