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Dark Times: British Theatre after Brexit

Dark Times: British Theatre after Brexit Dark Times British Theatre after Brexit Aleks Sierz In the dark times Will there also be singing? Yes, there will also be singing. About the dark times. Bertolt Brecht he UK Referendum vote to leave the European Union—Brexit—took place on 23 June 2016, and the result was a triumph of the irrational over reason. Of course, I am conscious that it is unfair for somebody like me—an ardent European—to characterize those who voted to Leave as unreasoning and deluded. After all, I’m a white middle-class man in full employment and living in Lambeth (the London borough which recorded the highest proportion of people in the country voting to Remain in the EU). However, I did see many moments during the campaign that reminded me forcefully of an incident that the late Peter F. Drucker, Austrian-born American management consultant and educator, mentions in his 1939 book, The End of Economic Man. At one point during the rise of Hitler he witnesses a “wildly cheering rally” at which a speaker proclaims, “We don’t want higher bread prices; we don’t want lower bread prices; we don’t want bread prices to stay the same—we want National Socialist bread prices!” During the Referendum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Dark Times: British Theatre after Brexit

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 1, 2017

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2017 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00346
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dark Times British Theatre after Brexit Aleks Sierz In the dark times Will there also be singing? Yes, there will also be singing. About the dark times. Bertolt Brecht he UK Referendum vote to leave the European Union—Brexit—took place on 23 June 2016, and the result was a triumph of the irrational over reason. Of course, I am conscious that it is unfair for somebody like me—an ardent European—to characterize those who voted to Leave as unreasoning and deluded. After all, I’m a white middle-class man in full employment and living in Lambeth (the London borough which recorded the highest proportion of people in the country voting to Remain in the EU). However, I did see many moments during the campaign that reminded me forcefully of an incident that the late Peter F. Drucker, Austrian-born American management consultant and educator, mentions in his 1939 book, The End of Economic Man. At one point during the rise of Hitler he witnesses a “wildly cheering rally” at which a speaker proclaims, “We don’t want higher bread prices; we don’t want lower bread prices; we don’t want bread prices to stay the same—we want National Socialist bread prices!” During the Referendum

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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