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Dancing With or Without You

Dancing With or Without You DANCING WITH OR WITHOUT YOU Amita Nijhawan In-I, a dance-theatre production by Akram Khan and Juliette Binoche at the National Theatre, London, September–October 2008. S ometimes togetherness can feel like distance. Sometimes togetherness can feel like distance all of the time. Akram Khan and Juliette Binoche’s characters in In-I share an anxious relationship. They run up against each other, collide, grind in frustration, fall apart, and then run up at each other again. The piece starts with an empty stage, set designer Anish Kapoor’s red wall as backdrop. Khan and Binoche walk in from two sides of the proscenium and sit themselves down on chairs placed quietly at opposite ends of the stage. Binoche relates the story of falling in love with a man, running after him as he attempts to flee, capturing him, and beginning a very troubled relationship. The two protagonists fall together, then apart, push each other away, pull together in an apparent mime of intimacy and distance that is at the same time both too literal and too simplistically vague. The dancers then go into an amusing parody of men and women attempting to live together. In one of the more entertaining moments in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2009 Amita Nijhawan
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj.2009.31.2.72
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DANCING WITH OR WITHOUT YOU Amita Nijhawan In-I, a dance-theatre production by Akram Khan and Juliette Binoche at the National Theatre, London, September–October 2008. S ometimes togetherness can feel like distance. Sometimes togetherness can feel like distance all of the time. Akram Khan and Juliette Binoche’s characters in In-I share an anxious relationship. They run up against each other, collide, grind in frustration, fall apart, and then run up at each other again. The piece starts with an empty stage, set designer Anish Kapoor’s red wall as backdrop. Khan and Binoche walk in from two sides of the proscenium and sit themselves down on chairs placed quietly at opposite ends of the stage. Binoche relates the story of falling in love with a man, running after him as he attempts to flee, capturing him, and beginning a very troubled relationship. The two protagonists fall together, then apart, push each other away, pull together in an apparent mime of intimacy and distance that is at the same time both too literal and too simplistically vague. The dancers then go into an amusing parody of men and women attempting to live together. In one of the more entertaining moments in

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: May 1, 2009

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