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Beyond Notation: Communicating Music

Beyond Notation: Communicating Music IntroductIon LMJ 21: Beyond Notation: Communicating Music or the Sonambiente festival of sound art in Berlin in 1996, Christian Marclay produced Graffiti Composition: Every other night during the month-long festival a crew of assistants would fan out across the town and plaster sanctioned kiosks and illicit walls with large sheets of white paper marked with 12 blank five-line staves—empty scores waiting to be filled; during the days a photographer would visit the same sites to document the public’s contribution to this city-wide collaborative composition. Most of the 5,000 sheets that were printed disappeared almost instantly, blown away, torn down or covered over. Some survived with no amendments other than a smudge of dirt or the brief visit of an occasional fly. But hundreds served their purpose, enticing people to jot down a musical passage, a doodle or, as someone wrote in tidy, quiet letters, “a message to the world” [1]. As befits the work of an artist who has for many years split his attention between the gallery and the concert hall, the photo documentation was both published as a print edition and used as the score for live performances. That any of the graffiti incorporated playable notes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Leonardo Music Journal MIT Press

Beyond Notation: Communicating Music

Leonardo Music Journal , Volume December 2011 (21) – Dec 1, 2011

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
©2011 ISAST
Subject
Introduction
ISSN
0961-1215
eISSN
1531-4812
DOI
10.1162/LMJ_a_00049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductIon LMJ 21: Beyond Notation: Communicating Music or the Sonambiente festival of sound art in Berlin in 1996, Christian Marclay produced Graffiti Composition: Every other night during the month-long festival a crew of assistants would fan out across the town and plaster sanctioned kiosks and illicit walls with large sheets of white paper marked with 12 blank five-line staves—empty scores waiting to be filled; during the days a photographer would visit the same sites to document the public’s contribution to this city-wide collaborative composition. Most of the 5,000 sheets that were printed disappeared almost instantly, blown away, torn down or covered over. Some survived with no amendments other than a smudge of dirt or the brief visit of an occasional fly. But hundreds served their purpose, enticing people to jot down a musical passage, a doodle or, as someone wrote in tidy, quiet letters, “a message to the world” [1]. As befits the work of an artist who has for many years split his attention between the gallery and the concert hall, the photo documentation was both published as a print edition and used as the score for live performances. That any of the graffiti incorporated playable notes

Journal

Leonardo Music JournalMIT Press

Published: Dec 1, 2011

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