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Behind the Scenes: Gregor Schneider's Totes Haus ur

Behind the Scenes: Gregor Schneider's Totes Haus ur ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Tim Miller in Body Blows. Photo courtesy of the artist. BEHIND THE SCENES Gregor Schneider’s Totes Haus ur Philip Auslander Imagine a number of houses, each with many rooms in each house, in each room innumerable cupboards, shelves, boxes, and somewhere, in each one of them, a tiny bead. It is easy enough to find the right house, room, cupboard, and shelf. But it is more difficult to find that tiny bead that rolled out today, glittered for a moment, and then disappeared from sight. —Constantin Stanislavski, An Actor Prepares1 I n this marvelously evocative passage, the great Russian theatre theorist Constantin Stanislavski, describes the actor’s quest for the right emotion memory. Squeezing through the tight spaces of Gregor Schneider’s Totes Haus ur at the 2001 Venice Biennale, feeling trapped, rubbing up against clammy walls, chancing on other adventurers, I felt as if I were engaged in such a quest. Like the psyche imagined by Stanislavski as multiple dwellings, the Totes Haus ur is actually several houses. It is made from parts of the Haus ur (begun in 1985)—which is both Schneider’s home in Rheydt, Germany, and his major piece as an artist— and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Behind the Scenes: Gregor Schneider's Totes Haus ur

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
Subject
Art & Performance Notes
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103322491719
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ART & PERFORMANCE NOTES Tim Miller in Body Blows. Photo courtesy of the artist. BEHIND THE SCENES Gregor Schneider’s Totes Haus ur Philip Auslander Imagine a number of houses, each with many rooms in each house, in each room innumerable cupboards, shelves, boxes, and somewhere, in each one of them, a tiny bead. It is easy enough to find the right house, room, cupboard, and shelf. But it is more difficult to find that tiny bead that rolled out today, glittered for a moment, and then disappeared from sight. —Constantin Stanislavski, An Actor Prepares1 I n this marvelously evocative passage, the great Russian theatre theorist Constantin Stanislavski, describes the actor’s quest for the right emotion memory. Squeezing through the tight spaces of Gregor Schneider’s Totes Haus ur at the 2001 Venice Biennale, feeling trapped, rubbing up against clammy walls, chancing on other adventurers, I felt as if I were engaged in such a quest. Like the psyche imagined by Stanislavski as multiple dwellings, the Totes Haus ur is actually several houses. It is made from parts of the Haus ur (begun in 1985)—which is both Schneider’s home in Rheydt, Germany, and his major piece as an artist— and

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

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