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Ballez Talks Back

Ballez Talks Back Ballez Talks Back Janet Werther Sleeping Beauty & the Beast, choreographed and directed by Katy Pyle in collaboration with Jules Skloot and The Ballez Company. La Mama Moves! Dance Festival, New York, April 29–May 8, 2016. he Ballez is an experimental dance company that uses ballet vocabulary to tell queer stories while simultaneously queering the ballet genre. Combining its techniques promiscuously with other styles, the company eschews ballet’s parameters of expertise, refusing to adhere to its gendered or bodily norms and expectations. Sleeping Beauty & the Beast is the second full-length Ballez.1 In the performance, I played the role of Little Red Riding Hood as part of the gender-diverse, multiracial, variously sized and trained cast that premiered the completed work at La Mama in the spring of 2016. T CHOREOGRAPHING A QUEER FANTASY Sleeping Beauty and the Beast begins in unison with the corps de ballet circling over and under taut cords of yarn, weaving the fabric of the universe in which the narrative will take place. Beyond its symbolic and narrative functions, this is the hardest dance I have ever performed. In this segment, ballet technique is not beholden to abstract ideals of line; it is in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2017 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/PAJJ_a_00351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ballez Talks Back Janet Werther Sleeping Beauty & the Beast, choreographed and directed by Katy Pyle in collaboration with Jules Skloot and The Ballez Company. La Mama Moves! Dance Festival, New York, April 29–May 8, 2016. he Ballez is an experimental dance company that uses ballet vocabulary to tell queer stories while simultaneously queering the ballet genre. Combining its techniques promiscuously with other styles, the company eschews ballet’s parameters of expertise, refusing to adhere to its gendered or bodily norms and expectations. Sleeping Beauty & the Beast is the second full-length Ballez.1 In the performance, I played the role of Little Red Riding Hood as part of the gender-diverse, multiracial, variously sized and trained cast that premiered the completed work at La Mama in the spring of 2016. T CHOREOGRAPHING A QUEER FANTASY Sleeping Beauty and the Beast begins in unison with the corps de ballet circling over and under taut cords of yarn, weaving the fabric of the universe in which the narrative will take place. Beyond its symbolic and narrative functions, this is the hardest dance I have ever performed. In this segment, ballet technique is not beholden to abstract ideals of line; it is in

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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