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AI Comes of Age

AI Comes of Age Ellen Pearlman ot since Philip Glass and Robert Wilson premiered Einstein on the Beach at the Avignon Festival in France in 1976 has a new work highlighted Nsuch a profound shift in the zeitgeist—in this case, the twenty-first cen - tur y’s Discrete Figures. Glass’s hypnotic minimalism soundscape complimented Wilson’s spare stage sets, while Einstein’s opening chorus intoned the sequential numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8. That combination, an unintentional presaging of the rise of 8-bit binary computer code accompanied by Lucinda Childs’s repetitive, linear choreography, mimicked the signal routing of then relatively unknown computer circuit boards. Discrete Figures, an interactive dance piece, explores the relationship between per- forming arts, math, the human body, and its simulated body. It is a line in the sand from which there is no turning back in terms of the use of machine learn- ing (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) in performance. Created by Tokyo-based artist, interaction designer, programmer, and DJ, Daito Manabe (Rhizomatics Research), and Kyle McDonald, an artist and coder, the piece was choreographed by “intrinsically Japanese” (her words) MIKIKO, with dancers from the Japan- based dance troupe ELEVENPLAY. After having its U.S. premiere at San Francisco’s Gray Area/Grand Theater on April 19–21, 2018, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

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Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
Copyright © MIT Press
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/pajj_a_00539
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ellen Pearlman ot since Philip Glass and Robert Wilson premiered Einstein on the Beach at the Avignon Festival in France in 1976 has a new work highlighted Nsuch a profound shift in the zeitgeist—in this case, the twenty-first cen - tur y’s Discrete Figures. Glass’s hypnotic minimalism soundscape complimented Wilson’s spare stage sets, while Einstein’s opening chorus intoned the sequential numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8. That combination, an unintentional presaging of the rise of 8-bit binary computer code accompanied by Lucinda Childs’s repetitive, linear choreography, mimicked the signal routing of then relatively unknown computer circuit boards. Discrete Figures, an interactive dance piece, explores the relationship between per- forming arts, math, the human body, and its simulated body. It is a line in the sand from which there is no turning back in terms of the use of machine learn- ing (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) in performance. Created by Tokyo-based artist, interaction designer, programmer, and DJ, Daito Manabe (Rhizomatics Research), and Kyle McDonald, an artist and coder, the piece was choreographed by “intrinsically Japanese” (her words) MIKIKO, with dancers from the Japan- based dance troupe ELEVENPLAY. After having its U.S. premiere at San Francisco’s Gray Area/Grand Theater on April 19–21, 2018, the

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2020

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