Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Public Servant

A Public Servant A Public Servant HANS HAACKE When Pierre Bourdieu died on January 23, a torrent of tributes, commentaries, and memories flooded the French media. Le Monde stopped the presses to make his demise the lead story. Although he had been a severe critic of their policies, the prime minister, Lionel Jospin, and President Jacques Chirac both considered it politic to pay homage. The Centre Georges Pompidou held a public tribute. The New York Times carried an obituary on page 41. Most readers had probably never heard of this “French Thinker and Globalization Critic.” In spite of Bourdieu’s numerous studies of the world of visual culture and the special interest of October in French-inspired discourse, he did not rank among those Parisians frequently credited in this journal’s footnotes. In English-speaking countries Bourdieu had, in fact, a relatively minimal presence outside of certain sociology departments. The more recent import of French intellectual fare was dominated by other names: Lacan, Foucault, Derrida, Kristeva, Deleuze. For a while even Jean Baudrillard held a sizable market share, particularly in the art and advertising industry (for years his name graced the masthead of Artforum). It would be a fascinating research project—in the tradition of Homo http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png October MIT Press

A Public Servant

October , Volume Summer 2002 (101) – Jul 1, 2002

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/a-public-servant-Tftq525GvL
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2002 October Magazine, Ltd. and Massachusetts Institute of Technology
ISSN
0162-2870
eISSN
1536-013X
DOI
10.1162/octo.2002.101.1.4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A Public Servant HANS HAACKE When Pierre Bourdieu died on January 23, a torrent of tributes, commentaries, and memories flooded the French media. Le Monde stopped the presses to make his demise the lead story. Although he had been a severe critic of their policies, the prime minister, Lionel Jospin, and President Jacques Chirac both considered it politic to pay homage. The Centre Georges Pompidou held a public tribute. The New York Times carried an obituary on page 41. Most readers had probably never heard of this “French Thinker and Globalization Critic.” In spite of Bourdieu’s numerous studies of the world of visual culture and the special interest of October in French-inspired discourse, he did not rank among those Parisians frequently credited in this journal’s footnotes. In English-speaking countries Bourdieu had, in fact, a relatively minimal presence outside of certain sociology departments. The more recent import of French intellectual fare was dominated by other names: Lacan, Foucault, Derrida, Kristeva, Deleuze. For a while even Jean Baudrillard held a sizable market share, particularly in the art and advertising industry (for years his name graced the masthead of Artforum). It would be a fascinating research project—in the tradition of Homo

Journal

OctoberMIT Press

Published: Jul 1, 2002

There are no references for this article.