Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A New Europe

A New Europe A NEW EUROPE Johannes Birringer WAR AND PEACE he widespread outrage and contempt, which many European citizens, old and young, expressed this past spring in their protests against the U.S. invasion of Iraq, are the background for my examination of the new Europe that has evolved since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The technological gap between U.S. military might and that of all other states has become obvious; the ideological shift, and the current chasm that has opened up between the New and the Old World, is more difficult to interpret. Some commentators, including the German Chancellor, have spoken of the “return of the political” (Rückkehr des Politischen ). The phrase resonates with understated European irony vis-à -vis the more ambitious millennial theses heard in the U.S. since 1989, from the “end of history” (Fukuyama) and the “clash of civilizations” (Huntington) to “Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus” (Robert Kagan). In the context of the military invasion of Iraq, and the Bush administration’s global war on terrorism in the aftermath of 9/11, this phrase points to a hegemonic foreign policy defining itself against any or all enemies. Concerning Iraq, the policy points towards control http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art MIT Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mit-press/a-new-europe-6de8cWRFm8
Publisher
MIT Press
Copyright
© 2003 Performing Arts Journal, Inc.
ISSN
1520-281X
eISSN
1537-9477
DOI
10.1162/152028103322491665
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A NEW EUROPE Johannes Birringer WAR AND PEACE he widespread outrage and contempt, which many European citizens, old and young, expressed this past spring in their protests against the U.S. invasion of Iraq, are the background for my examination of the new Europe that has evolved since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The technological gap between U.S. military might and that of all other states has become obvious; the ideological shift, and the current chasm that has opened up between the New and the Old World, is more difficult to interpret. Some commentators, including the German Chancellor, have spoken of the “return of the political” (Rückkehr des Politischen ). The phrase resonates with understated European irony vis-à -vis the more ambitious millennial theses heard in the U.S. since 1989, from the “end of history” (Fukuyama) and the “clash of civilizations” (Huntington) to “Americans are from Mars and Europeans are from Venus” (Robert Kagan). In the context of the military invasion of Iraq, and the Bush administration’s global war on terrorism in the aftermath of 9/11, this phrase points to a hegemonic foreign policy defining itself against any or all enemies. Concerning Iraq, the policy points towards control

Journal

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and ArtMIT Press

Published: Sep 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.