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Acceptability of Breast Milk Donor Banking: A qualitative study among Health Workers in Greater Accra Regional Hospital, Ghana

Acceptability of Breast Milk Donor Banking: A qualitative study among Health Workers in Greater... 27 Despite the compelling evidence demonstrating the immediate and long-term health 28 advantages of prompt breastfeeding beginning, not all newborns are breastfed exclusively for 29 a variety of reasons. As a result, the World Health Organization has made new 30 recommendations for the adoption of breastmilk donor banks to make sure that children 31 receive breastmilk when mothers are unable to produce it. In order to better understand how 32 health professionals at the Greater Accra Regional Hospital, who would be leading the charge 33 in putting this policy into practice, perceive and accept the practice of storing breastmilk, this 34 study was conducted. At the Greater Accra Regional Hospital, 18 healthcare professionals 35 were chosen using maximum variation purposive sampling procedures. They were made up 36 of eleven midwives, a medical officer, six nurses, and two nutritionists and all participants 37 were interviewed face to face using a semi structured interview guide. Data was transcribed 38 verbatim and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants in the study admitted that 39 they would be open to using or contributing to a bank of breastmilk. Participants also said 40 that if safety precautions are taken, they would urge their customers to give breastmilk and 41 recommend breastmilk from a breastmilk bank to them when the situation calls for it. Health 42 professionals recommended that education be provided prior to the installation of breast milk 43 donor banking to lessen or eliminate any misconceptions people may have about it. The 44 concept of breastmilk donor banking was fairly accepted among health workers. 45 Misconceptions about the safety of breast milk was the main concern. The results emphasize 46 the necessity of greater stakeholder engagement and education prior to the implementation of 47 this policy in order to boost acceptance and uptake. 2 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 51 Introduction 53 Breast milk is the safest and most protective food for infants, and it's also the ideal choice for 54 feeding premature and ill babies. For the first six months of life, breastmilk meets all 55 nutritional needs [1]. Also, it shields the youngster from malnutrition and promotes healthy 56 growth. Non-nutrient components of breast milk include immunoglobulins and lactoferrin, 57 which can help in intestinal maturation and adaptation as well as protection from viral and 58 inflammatory illnesses [2]. The World Health Organization (WHO) advises only six months 59 of exclusive breastfeeding. Up until the age of two, supplemental feeding is advised, and after 60 that, it can continue for as long as the mother and child see fit [3] . Exclusive breastfeeding 61 (EBF) is recommended to reduce infant mortality and improve health and cognitive 62 development by preventing infection [4]. 64 Only 42% of the 135 million babies born each year throughout the world receive only breast 65 milk for the first hour, 38% of moms breastfeed exclusively for the first six months, and 58% 66 of mothers exclusively breastfeed their kids until they are two years old [1]. Despite the fact 67 that 98% of Ghanaian women claim to have breastfed their children at some time, infant 68 feeding methods like exclusive breastfeeding and sufficient supplemental feeding are not 69 frequently used [5]. USAID is working in Ghana to promote newborn and young child eating, 70 including nursing practices, as one of many initiatives to lower the high rates of children who 71 are too small for their age or stunted in the nation [6]. Historically and throughout cultures, 72 informal breastfeeding sharing has been reported across cultures [2]. Peer-to-peer milk 73 sharing is frequently done by mothers within their social circle [7]. Peer-to-peer milk sharing 74 has the intention of providing human milk to infants whose parents are unable to provide any 75 or enough milk, but this unregulated practice carries some risk because the milks are not 3 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 76 subjected to any serological testing or screening, which means that diseases like Hepatitis B, 77 syphilis, HIV, and other diseases may not be detected [8]. Human milk is the best food for all 78 newborn humans. Nonetheless, there are several situations where the mother is unable or 79 unwilling to breastfeed. A replacement is necessary in these circumstances [9]. 81 If possible and safe, WHO advises replacement feeding when breastfeeding, especially 82 exclusive breastfeeding, may be hampered. Options for bridging the gap include donor breast 83 milk from a human milk bank and formula feeding. Breast milk banks have been proposed as 84 a means of preserving and donating breast milk to help feed neonates whose mothers are 85 unable to breastfeed owing to several reasons [10]. At least 800,000 children worldwide 86 receive donor human milk each year through breastmilk banking, according to a report by a 87 virtual communication network of leaders in global milk banking from the year 2020 [11]. 88 There are currently 248 Human Milk Banks spread across 26 European countries, according 89 to the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA) [12]. However, the implementation of 90 breastmilk banking has been slow in Africa [8]. 92 According to estimates, only 42% of breastfeeding moms in Ghana continue to do so for the 93 whole 20–23 months, whereas 43% of women exclusively breastfeed for 0–5 months. Even 94 though the Ghanaian government has put rules in place to encourage exclusive breastfeeding, 95 there are still significant obstacles standing in the way of achieving the best possible 96 outcomes for newborn health and wellbeing, necessitating the possibility of breast milk 97 banking. In a previous study, 8% of mothers admitted to ever giving breastmilk to another 98 mother without having the milk screened [13]. As a result, it's critical to investigate the WHO 99 suggestion of donor banking for breastmilk, which offers the chance for the milk to be 4 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 100 checked before use. Nonetheless, the support of important stakeholders like health workers is 101 necessary for the implementation of this strategy. Hence, this study was conducted to explore 102 breast milk donor bank acceptability among health workers in Greater Accra Region of 103 Ghana. 104 Methods and Material 106 Ethical approval 107 The Ghana Health Service Ethics Review Committee (GHS-ERC 030/09/22) granted ethical 108 approval for the study. Also, permission from the Greater Accra Regional Hospital's 109 administration was sought in order to carry out the study. An informed consent document was 110 signed by each study subject. 111 Study design 112 The study relied on a narrative study design [14]. The research was designed to allow 113 participants to express their understandings and perceptions of the meaning and experiences 114 related to the breast milk bank because individuals and groups of people perceive a 115 phenomenon differently [15]. The data for the study was collected among health workers at 116 Greater Accra Regional Hospital. The hospital renders antenatal and delivery services to 117 pregnant women and is a secondary level government hospital supporting the leading referral 118 centre in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, thereby positioning it favourably as the study 119 setting. 120 Theoretical underpinnings of study 121 The acceptability framework created by Sekhon and colleagues [16] was used in the 122 investigation. While planning, carrying out, and putting into practice wellness interventions, 123 acceptance is a crucial factor to consider. Based on predicted or actual cognitive and emotional 5 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 124 responses to the intervention, it is a complex term that reflects the degree to which those 125 delivering or receiving healthcare interventions feel them to be acceptable [16]. The seven 126 component constructs that make up the theoretical framework of acceptability (TFA) are 127 affective attitude, burden, ethicality, intervention coherence, opportunity cost, perceived 128 effectiveness, and self efficacy [16]. 130 Affective attitude examines how a person feels about a particular intervention. The apparent 131 effort needed to take part in an intervention is what is meant by the load. The degree to which 132 the intervention fits well with the person's set of values is what constitutes ethicality. The 133 degree to which participants comprehend the intervention and its mechanism of action is 134 measured by its coherence. Opportunity costs examine whether gains, earnings, or values will 135 be sacrificed while relying on an intervention directly or indirectly. The degree to which an 136 intervention is considered as likely to fulfill its goals is covered by perceived effectiveness, and 137 the participants' self-efficacy is examined by perceived effectiveness and self-efficacy, 138 respectively [16]. These seven principles were combined in determining acceptability of 139 breastmilk donor banking. 141 Study population and sampling 142 Health professionals from Accra's Greater Accra Regional Hospital made up the study's 143 target population. In this investigation, maximum variation purposive sampling was used. To 144 determine which hospital departments are involved in infant feeding, the researchers got in 145 touch with the medical director of the facility. Based on this, the departments were 146 approached to request participant nominations for projects that have a direct bearing on 147 breastfeeding infants. A total of 18 health professionals, including 11 midwives, 4 nurses, 2 6 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 148 nutritionists, and a medical doctor, participated in the study on the basis of data saturation. 149 Before collecting data, consent forms were distributed to health personnel who wished to 150 participate in the study. 152 Data collection tool and procedure 153 An interview guide was used to conduct the in-depth interviews. The interview concentrated 154 on the understanding and attitudes of health professionals on the appropriateness of 155 breastmilk donor banking. One of the main issues was respondents' inclination or 156 unwillingness to recommend families and potential families to give and/or use donated 157 breastmilk, or to donate and/or use donated breastmilk to nourish their needed infants. Also 158 requested was permission to record the interviews. Following each interview, participants' 159 sociodemographic and professional information was collected on a separate form. As a 160 method of participant validation, the interviewer outlined the main points after the interview 161 [17]. An interview session takes 45 to 60 minutes to complete. 162 Data analysis 163 Using version 13 of QSR NVivo, data was examined. For this study, a thematic approach was 164 used. The taped interviews were completely transcribed in order to guarantee credibility and 165 objective results. The data was independently coded, and the transcript was cross-checked. 166 Coding results were examined, and codes were examined for consistency, to assure intercoder 167 concordance [18]. Themes and new issues were established when the codes were jointly 168 reviewed. Themes and topics from the interview guide were initially used to analyze the data. 169 An inductive technique was used to discover additional themes, sub-themes, and patterns in 170 the data [19]. Finally, quotes from the study subjects were used to support the points made. 7 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 171 RESULTS 172 Socio demographics of participants 173 The sociodemographic details of the participants are shown in Table 1. Of the eighteen (18) 174 volunteers gathered for the study, eleven (11) were midwives. There were five nurses, two 175 nutritionists, and one medical doctor. Two (2) men and sixteen (16) women who responded to 176 the survey were the respondents. The responders' average age was close to thirty (30) years. 177 A postgraduate degree was the greatest level of education earned by the respondents, and a 178 diploma was the lowest. Just two (2) of the respondents were Muslims but the majority, were 179 Christians. 180 Table 1: Socio-demographic characteristics of study participants Characteristics Number Percentage (%) Gender Of Respondents Male 16 88.89 Female 2 11.11 Profession Of Respondents Medical Officer 1 5.56 Midwife 11 61.11 Nurse 4 88.89 Nutritionist 2 11.11 Marital Status Married 8 44.44 Never Married 10 55.56 Religion Christian 16 88.89 Islam 2 11.11 Educational Attainment Diploma 5 27.78 Degree 12 66.67 Postgraduate 1 5.56 8 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 182 Themes from Data 183 A summary of the global, main and subthemes that emerged from the data is provided in 184 Table 2. 185 Table 2: Main themes and subthemes Global themes Main themes Sub themes Knowledge about breast milk Knowledge  Knowledge on breastmilk donor donor banking banking Perception of Health workers Safety of breastmilk  Fear of transmission of diseases such regarding breastfeeding and as HIV breast milk donor banking  Fear of transmitting hereditary traits to infants Challenges and concern  Low patronage  Reluctance of mothers to donate  Storage of breastmilk  Risk of infections  Breast milk bank is beneficial Significance of  Reduction of infant mortality breastmilk  Protection against diseases  Activities of some religious and Cultural, ethics and traditional leaders religious considerations  Regulations of certain Christian churches  The practice is ethical The use of infant  Cost formulas against  Preparation for use breastmilk from a  Risks for infants breastmilk bank (Pre NAN etc.)  Health benefits Acceptability of breastmilk Affective Attitude  Excitement donor banking among health  Happy workers Opportunity cost  Loss of bond, attachment Intervention coherence  Participants’ understanding of its operation Perceived effectiveness  Willingness to donate/ reluctance to donate breastmilk  Willingness to use donated donor breastmilk for feeding their infant Things that need to be  Education 9 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . put in place before  Provision of qualified personnel implementation  Motivations 187 Knowledge on breastmilk donor banking 188 Breastmilk donor banking is described by healthcare professionals as the storing of expressed 189 breastmilk for use in feeding other infants. According to a midwife's definition, it has also 190 been used to feed infants whose moms are unable to breastfeed due to medical issues. While 191 some healthcare professionals appeared to be unaware of the logic behind breastmilk donor 192 banking, others were previously familiar with it. These health professionals said that their 193 primary sources of information on breastmilk banks were the school, their peers, and the 194 internet. As supported by these quotations, some definitions given by healthcare professionals 195 regarding the banking of breastmilk were as follows: 196 “I learnt it’s a bank just like the blood bank, where breastmilk is donated by various 197 women, collected, screened (I mean it is passed through various investigations), 198 packaged and stored under certain temperature and made readily available for 199 mothers whom under certain conditions cannot breastfeed their babies.” (Midwife 1) 200 “It is the storing of donated breastmilk from mothers to feed children who have no 201 opportunity to get breastmilk from their biological mothers.” (Midwife 2) 202 One midwife added that she learned about it while the COVID-19 outbreak was going on. 203 The following quotation demonstrates this idea: 204 “To be honest I never knew of such a thing till the COVID-19 time when I learnt in the 205 West, people were donating their breastmilk due to the shortage of formular feeds, 206 that was when I knew you can even do such a thing.” (Midwife, participant 7) 10 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 207 In addition to some medical professionals declaring unequivocally that this is the first time 208 they had heard of it, one midwife made a comparison to other methods of breastfeeding an 209 infant, particularly when they are ill. The following passage supports my point: 210 “No, I don’t know such a thing like that. What I know is like when your child is being 211 admitted to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit), sometimes the mother can’t go there and 212 breastfeed so sometimes, they withdraw the milk into a container so that we feed the 213 babies with those milk.” (Midwife, 5) 215 Perception of health workers regarding breastmilk donor banking 217 Benefits of breastmilk donor banking 218 After the notion was conveyed to health personnel, they agreed that the introduction of 219 breastmilk donor banking is a very good idea. Health professionals acknowledged that not 220 every newborn has the opportunity to get breastmilk due to circumstances making it difficult 221 for the mother to do so, and that the introduction of breastmilk banking will help solve this 222 issue. The quotes that follow emphasize these viewpoints: 224 “I think it’s a good idea because as I said, sometimes when there is loss of life it 225 becomes very difficult for anyone to just get up and breastfeed someone else’s child 226 but if something like this is at play, I feel it’s going to be a very good idea and a very 227 good source for the other babies who are lacking in that aspect to also benefit from 228 the benefits of breastmilk.” (Midwife, 3) 229 “It will benefit the baby and the mother at large. The baby will get all the nutrients 230 required from breastmilk, it will increase the child’s mental and general development 231 and childhood disease and infections would be prevented.” (Midwife, 12) 11 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 232 There was widespread consensus that breast milk banks were beneficial since they will 233 reduce premature mortality, according to the medical community. In light of the advantages, 234 health practitioners generally had positive opinions about breastmilk banks. The quotes below 235 serve to emphasize this: 237 “I will say it will reduce infant mortality of premature babies whose mothers can’t 238 breastfeed or express their milk for use to feed the baby. It will also benefit orphans. 239 It will benefit babies who wouldn’t have mothers’ milk to feed on they will also have 240 the chance to be exclusively breastfed, mothers wouldn’t have to worry about not 241 been able to produce enough breastmilk for their kids, HIV infected mothers wouldn’t 242 have the problem to think about how they are going to breastfeed their infant.” 243 (Nurse, 3) 244 “… It would reduce infant mortality because the introduction to breastmilk in an 245 infant life will protect the child from minor illnesses and will boost the immune system 246 of the child. Breastmilk is the best food for a newly born baby.” (Midwife, 14) 247 The practice of exclusive breastfeeding was a concern for health professionals, particularly 248 those who were mothers, due to their line of work. They said that the necessary six months of 249 exclusive breastfeeding could not be practiced during the three months of maternity leave and 250 that the installation of a breastmilk bank would enable them to breastfeed their children 251 entirely. The quotes that follow further explain this idea: 252 “…our maternity leave is not enough and sometimes expressing the milk too is time 253 consuming for the mothers so if you are lazy or not dedicated, you cannot breastfeed 254 so breastmilk bank will save us from all these…” (Midwife, 1) 12 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 255 “I did not do exclusive breastfeeding for the first two children, I did it for the last one. 256 The first two because the annual leave is almost two months, and the maternity leave 257 is three months, so I couldn’t do it.” (Nurse, 2) 258 “Sometimes the time isn’t enough for us to breastfeed exclusively; even when it comes 259 to expressing the breastmilk to feed your child, it also takes time so if you are not 260 determined to breastfeed your child, then you might end up feeding your baby with the 261 infant formulas which is also expensive and if not prepared well can harm your 262 child.” (Nurse, 4) 263 Donor breastmilk banking was regarded as a moral practice. Health professionals believed 264 that the practice was not novel and that it was appropriate for a community in Ghana. Health 265 professionals noted that in the past, close relatives would wet nurse infants when the original 266 mother was unable to do so. Health professionals emphasized that the introduction of 267 breastmilk donor banking was an advanced form of wet nursing and that the practice had 268 been discontinued owing to the risk of spreading diseases or infections. The quotes that 269 follow demonstrate these ideas: 271 “I would say it’s not against our moral principle. It’s a remedy to a problem so I 272 don’t see anything wrong with it.” (Nurse, 1) 273 “It’s already out there just that it’s among families. My mother told me good stories 274 about it; like you give birth, and you are no more, your mother or anyone that has 275 given birth before can breast feed your child. You just need to stimulate the breast 276 and the milk will come. This is just a means of formalizing it. If my sister gives birth 277 and God forbids, she is no more, ah I will feed the child. People are doing it, I can 278 assure you.” (Nurse, 3) 13 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 279 “In the olden days when someone delivers and dies or maybe is sick and there is a 280 relative or a friend who has delivered, the person can breastfeed the child; but now 281 fear of infections and all that, like STI….” (Nurse 2) 282 Christian and Muslim health professionals who were asked if their faith would prevent them 283 from accepting breastmilk donor banks gave good responses. However, several medical 284 professionals expressed worry that some Christian churches, whose names have been 285 omitted, would not endorse it even though they are in favor. The following accounts lend 286 credence to these opinions: 288 “Religiously I think maybe the same group of people who have problem with the 289 blood bank is the same people who will have issues with the breastmilk donor banking 290 but personally my religion will not frown on it.” (Nurse 2, Christian) 291 “… my religion will tell me that anything that will benefit you it doesn’t prevent it so 292 religiously my religion wouldn’t prevent me.” (Nurse 3, Muslim) 293 “I don’t think I would have any problem with that personally and religiously as well 294 because it’s something that’s going to benefit the child and not going to harm the 295 child so religiously, I don’t think there should be a problem with that.” (Midwife 3, 296 Muslim) 297 Risk of infections from contaminated breastmilk 298 Despite the fact that the health professionals thought the intervention was effective, some 299 people believed that given a baby's immunization, it wasn't safe to use it to feed them. Infant 300 feeding safety issues as well as the possibility that children could acquire genetic or inherited 301 features from unknowing donors, including the danger of HIV infection, were highlighted. 302 The quotes below demonstrate this position: 14 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 304 “Genetically I don’t know what is within that breastmilk production, you know, there 305 might be cancer cells in that breastmilk that I am feeding because it’s been produced 306 by another mother and you know everything is made up of cells so it is cells that are 307 generating all these things, so if it’s generating something like that, I don’t know 308 whether there are traces of cancer cells in that person’s family or something like a 309 genetic disease or something. It’s been screened o, but deep down it’s not 100% 310 safe.” (Midwife 10) 311 “It is a good intervention I will say but where I am reluctant or where I am holding 312 back is, will it be safe? As in will it be hygienic and free from diseases like HIV? Are 313 we having the resources to operate it in Ghana? It will be safe when it is screened for 314 infections so that it doesn’t cause harm to the infant.” (Nurse 4) 315 Health professionals emphasized that there would be no cause for concern if only the donors 316 and breastmilk were screened for illnesses to make it safe. The narratives that follow support 317 this assertion: 318 “So far as they will be screened for its safety, then it is good because there are people 319 who are not healthy to do so but so far as it would be screened then it is a good 320 initiative because breastmilk contains essential nutrients.” (Midwife, 12) 321 “I was doubting because I don’t think it would be safe for me to come and take 322 breastmilk to feed my child in case of anything but if it undergoes processes and if all 323 other things concerning its safety can be taken care of then there is nothing wrong 324 about it.” (Midwife, 9) 325 A medical official who agreed that breastmilk should be checked for safety said that health 326 professionals are also susceptible to making mistakes, such as wrongly declaring an HIV 15 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 327 positive donor negative, which might have a significant detrimental impact on an unborn 328 child. The following assertion demonstrates this: 329 “Fine it will go through some processes, mothers would be screened and all that but 330 in the medical field too we tend to be negligent sometimes. You might mistake 331 somebody’s report for another’s; let’s say if a mother is retro positive and then the 332 person goes to donate milk and we mix the report with another person’s own thinking 333 the mother is negative, what have you done to the baby? You have automatically 334 infected the baby with HIV so when it comes to the medical side it is a no no. I also 335 think it is not really necessary in this part of the world because we do well when it 336 comes to breastfeeding.” (Medical Officer 1) 337 Preference for donor breastmilk versus artificial formula 338 Health professionals emphasized that in terms of health benefits, artificial formulas fall well 339 short of breastmilk. Respondents claimed that poor preparation of formula had a detrimental 340 impact on newborns. Health professionals believed that, despite the cost of saved breastmilk, 341 it wouldn't be as expensive as infant formula. These respondents' opinions are illustrated by 342 the quotes that follow: 343 “Compared to formula feeds, breastmilk has a lot more nutrients than formula feeds. 344 The feeds have some side effects of formula feedings including allergy and 345 constipation. The cost of artificial formula is high. Even though donor milk will cost 346 money, I don't think it will cost much more than artificial formulas.” (Midwife, 12) 347 “… breastmilk is highly nutritious than infant formulas; what role breastmilk plays 348 cannot be compared to artificial formulas. It contains antibodies and other nutrients 349 that help fight against diseases so health wise the breastmilk will be better in terms of 350 this aspect and that’s what we want to achieve.” (Midwife, 7) 16 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 351 “With the artificial formulas, I don’t think it is the best because it does not contain the 352 necessary nutrients as compared to the breastmilk so with the artificial formulas, I 353 myself I don’t even like it when babies are giving artificial formulas.” (Midwife, 10) 354 There were two perspectives on how convenient donor breastmilk or baby formulae were. 355 Regarding saving time, several of the responders thought donor breastmilk was more 356 practical because it didn't require preparation time, unlike artificial formulas that needed 357 boiling water and clean bowls and spoons to avoid contaminating the feed. Some experts took 358 accessibility into account when deciding on the convenience. Formula feeds were thought to 359 be more approachable in that regard. Breastmilk from a donor bank is more practical when 360 decisions are made based on potential health advantages. The following narratives serve as 361 examples of these viewpoints: 363 “The breast milk or the breastmilk bank is convenient because you are not going to 364 prepare it, you are just going to take and give; but with the artificial you are now 365 going to prepare it. You need to look at the instructions, put water (boiled water hot 366 cold, you know) and you either add more milk, less water or vice versa. But with the 367 breast milk you just take it and you are giving it to the baby.” (Nurse 3) 368 “With the convenience, the formula feeds will be convenient because it can be found 369 in most shops to buy but with the donor breastmilk you will have to go to a breastmilk 370 bank before you can get access to it.” (Nurse 2) 371 “There is no doubt that breastmilk is the best and it cannot be compared to formulas 372 irrespective of its cost and convenience but as Ghanaians we will prefer something 373 accessible and less expensive. So if the donor breastmilk is in existence and it’s also 17 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 374 going for a cost, mothers or families would prefer the formulas because for the 375 formulas it’s all over stores and you can get it anytime.” (Medical Officer 1) 376 Challenges health workers anticipate with regards to breast milk donor banking 377 The primary difficulty that health experts anticipated was the safety of donor breastmilk to 378 feed newborns. They believed that people would continue to wonder if donated human milk 379 would be safe to give to infants. Also, they expressed their uncertainty as to whether moms 380 would feel the use of stored breastmilk to be suitable. The following statements provide 381 examples of these viewpoints: 382 “People will be concerned about the safety of the breastmilk; medically, had the 383 breastmilk gone through screening? Is it safe? Would the baby get some form of, 384 probably condition or diseases, should in case the donor have those conditions, like 385 would there be some form of transfers that will affects the child’s health?” 386 (Nutritionist, 1) 387 “I think the concern people might raise more is you not knowing the person the 388 breastmilk is from, people not being sure. You said you are screening, are you sure 389 you screened it? And then the conditions, the hygienic condition; I think these are the 390 things people would raise concerns about.” (Midwife, 2) 391 “People will also be concerned about the safety of it whether it has really undergone 392 some level of screening to make it safe. So, if they are 100% sure that the breastmilk 393 does not contain any infections and that when given to my baby it wouldn’t harm him 394 or her.” (Midwife, 10) 395 Health professionals also expected that mothers could be reluctant to give breastmilk to a 396 bank, which might lead to shortages and undermine the bank's success. As we don't have 18 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 397 enough competent workers, some health professionals expressed concern that its safety would 398 be at risk. The quotes that follow emphasize these ideas: 399 “The operation of donor milk banking will depend on mothers donating breastmilk to 400 the bank so if in future mothers feel reluctant to donate, the operation wouldn’t 401 achieve its purpose.” (Midwife 8) 402 “I feel it would be hard to get donors because this is not the need now in our 403 hospitals and maybe certain cultural beliefs will also hinder people from patronizing 404 it. I also feel its safety would be compromised because we don’t have the personnel, I 405 mean the technical know-how to handle a breastmilk bank. Even when it’s been 406 operated, the bond between mother and child might be lost.” (Medical Officer, 1) 407 “There can be shortage of breastmilk when it becomes rooted, and everybody is 408 purchasing, and we are not getting people to replace the breast milk.” (Midwife,1) 410 Some medical professionals were also concerned about how breastmilk is stored and how 411 long it may be kept in the breast bank before becoming bad. The following quotations support 412 this claim: 414 “…how long will be breastmilk be stored because even if we have donors and people 415 don’t come for the breastmilk the milk might go waste.” (Midwife 8) 416 “How long can it be stored without the milk going bad? If mothers are given enough 417 breastmilk to take home, can our normal refrigerator store it? If yes, at what 418 temperature? Will mothers avail themselves to donate at a breastmilk bank?” 419 (Midwife, 6) 19 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 420 Health professionals also predicted that a difficulty to the complete implementation of 421 breastmilk banking in Ghana would be funding and the sustainability of breast banks. Some 422 examples support this viewpoint: 423 “I think that we do not have the resources unless we are getting the support from 424 maybe international bodies. Funding can be a problem and after getting it done 425 sustainability can also be a problem.” (Midwife, 6) 426 “Some of the challenges will be the source of funding. Looking at our current 427 economy, I am wondering if this would be possible. Aside from the funding, people 428 will still be worried about whether it is safe for feeding infants. Will mothers come out 429 in their numbers to donate?” (Midwife, 3) 430 Acceptance of breastmilk donor banking 431 Health professionals who could explain the advantages to potential clients were generally in 432 favor of the idea of breastmilk donor banking. Participants were excited about the idea of 433 breastmilk banking and gushed about how it would help moms in their quest to feed their 434 babies by saving them time and money. The sentiment expressed by medical professionals 435 concerning the creation of breastmilk donor banks is exemplified by the quotes below: 436 “I’m very excited about this. I feel is a good plan, it should come, and it should stay. I 437 am positive about this- I hope it works out.” (Midwife, 3) 438 “I will be really excited to see it being implemented here in this hospital. As I said, 439 it’s going to help a lot because there are instances where people must go outside to go 440 and feed their baby. So, with this it’s going to help these mothers a lot; it will save 441 money and time.” (Nurse, 3) 20 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 442 The study's findings also demonstrated that establishing a breast milk bank in Ghana would 443 be successful in the long run. Health professionals predicted that it wouldn't be simple to 444 maintain it at first, but that it would eventually succeed. 445 “It would work as long as the organizations are willing to support, and mothers are 446 willing to offer themselves as point of donors it will work but it will come with its own 447 resistance. Even if it doesn’t work at the first trial and those gaps that made it not to 448 work are fixed then with time it would work.” (Nutritionist, 1) 449 “It will work. Starting something is difficult but if people notice its benefit, they will 450 accept it.” (Midwife, 7) 451 “… there are some people who will accept it and there are some who will not accept 452 it. We must start and see the way forward because I believe that interventions are not 453 meant for everyone because there are some people who will be in dire need of it and 454 those people will accept and patronize it.” (Midwife, 12) 456 When the necessity arose, health professionals expressed their willingness to donate and/or 457 use donated breastmilk to feed their infants. Health professionals were also willing to advise 458 individuals in need to use donated breastmilk to feed their infants when necessary and to urge 459 moms who have extra milk to give it to a breastmilk bank. The quotes below demonstrate 460 these ideas: 462 “If I’m in the place to donate fine and if there is someone who can donate too, I think 463 I will advise because if it helps another child, why not?” (Midwife, 9) 464 “Yes, I will. Once it’s going to help the baby and the mother, I will, and I will also 465 advice someone to do it.” (Midwife, 4) 21 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 466 “For me, at the moment I have finish giving birth so I don’t think I will have any, but 467 I’m willing to advice other women or colleagues to participate if they have enough to 468 give.” (Midwife, 8) 469 While some healthcare professionals held the opinion that if they had an excess supply of 470 breastmilk, they would donate it to a breast bank and advise women without medical 471 conditions to do the same, others emphasized that they would only do so if the security of the 472 breastmilk banking can be ensured. 473 “If there are reports that the safety of it has been compromised, I wouldn’t keep 474 recommending it to people. If the safety of it is compromised, then there is no point of 475 buying something that is not worth the quality.” (Nutritionist, 1) 476 “If the donor is ill and doesn’t have the strength to donate, I will not advise; aside 477 that I don’t think something will prevent me from recommending it.” (Nurse, 3) 478 Pre-implementation preparations 479 All of the healthcare professionals agreed that the key strategies for making this intervention 480 successful were education and training. From the planning stage through the implementation 481 stage, education was advised at every stage. Health professionals believed that the only way 482 to dispel myths and misconceptions about breast milk banks was via education. Before 483 beginning this intervention, health professionals recognized the need to educate stakeholders, 484 moms, couples, and the general public. Stakeholders should be involved at the planning 485 stage, according to health professionals. The following quotations serve as examples of these 486 viewpoints: 487 “…the public should be educated about it. It is very necessary because it’s going to 488 eliminate their negative perception about it especially about the safety of it.” 489 (Midwife, 1) 22 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 490 “There should be consistent education on it, through the media, opinion leaders, 491 churches, the community should be involved, and this will make it easier for it to be 492 implemented. The community should also be assured of the safety of the donor milk.” 493 (Midwife, 5) 494 “There should be qualified personnel that would be in charge of it, there should be 495 intensive education to the public concerning its operation and the processes 496 breastmilk would go through because it is something new.” (Midwife, 12) 497 Health professionals also suggested ways to reward moms who agree to give breastmilk to a 498 bank. They believed that rewards in the form of incentives could inspire or uplift the spirits of 499 moms who have extra breast milk and want to donate it to a breastmilk bank. They viewed 500 this drive as a tool to persuade moms with extra milk to voluntarily offer it to a breastmilk 501 bank as a donation. The quotes below demonstrate these ideas: 502 If the nearest donor facility is at Korle Bu and I am here at Ridge I will not pick a car 503 and go so the government, WHO, UNICEF and other bodies should heavily subsidize it 504 and maybe compensate mothers who donate their milk.” (Nurse, 3) 505 “I wouldn’t donate if I won’t be given any supplement to replace the energy I used to 506 donate [laughs]. Yes, at least donors should be compensated. I think with this, mothers 507 would feel encouraged to donate to a breast bank.” (Midwife, 1) 508 Finally, health professionals underlined the need to involve stakeholders in the development 509 of a policy to direct and regulate the nation's breast milk bank before implementation, as seen 510 in the following example: 511 “There is a need for stakeholders’ engagements before implementation. This would be 512 an initial good step. In addition to that we need to develop a policy to guide the 23 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 513 process. Otherwise, you may several people setting up breastmilk banks because fo 514 monetary gains” (Medical Officer 1) 515 DISCUSSION 516 This qualitative study looked at how well-liked breast milk donor banking is among medical 517 professionals. The study makes it clear that some health professionals initially did not think 518 this study was necessary because they knew little to nothing about breastmilk donor banks. 519 Hence, there was very little initial acceptance among these health professionals; nevertheless, 520 after being explained the basic idea behind breastmilk donor banking, the majority of the 521 professionals displayed a favorable attitude. It sent a message that someone might dismiss an 522 intervention if they have little or no awareness about it. Health professionals who were 523 familiar with the practice of wet nursing also acquired a favorable perspective on the 524 activities of breastmilk donor banking. This was due to the fact that these health professionals 525 equated breastfeeding a newborn with the milk of a close friend or family with the practice of 526 breastmilk donor banking. Health professionals who said they were aware of and 527 knowledgeable with breastmilk donor banking were able to define it correctly. Colleagues 528 and educational institutions were cited as the primary sources of information. The study 529 found that understanding breast milk donor banking has a beneficial impact on people's 530 acceptance of its practice. This outcome from the current study is supported by research done 531 years earlier. A Brazilian study found that donating human milk for primary healthcare was 532 strongly correlated with knowledge of milk expression [20]. According to a related study by 533 Chagwena et al., having in-depth knowledge of breastmilk banks was associated with 534 acceptance of donor human milk banking [21]. The main obstacles preventing postpartum 535 women from donating or accepting donor milk, according to Zhang et al., are a lack of 536 knowledge regarding breastmilk donor banks and its safety [22]. 24 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 538 The study also revealed that health professionals believed the establishment of breastmilk 539 banks in Ghanaian hospitals was an excellent concept and a great way for newborns who are 540 lacking in that area to still benefit from breastmilk. According to the study, feeding needy 541 children donor breastmilk will lower infant mortality and morbidity because the babies will 542 have ready access to food, reducing the risk of infections. It was believed that giving a needy 543 baby breastmilk from a bank would enhance the percentage of exclusive breastfeeding, hence 544 preventing disease and mortality, because health practitioners emphasized how healthy 545 breastmilk is. According to the study, health professionals believe that obtaining breastmilk 546 from a bank is preferable than using infant formula because the latter exposes babies to 547 diseases when it is not produced hygienically. Yet, it was found that moms who couldn't 548 afford to buy breastmilk from a breastmilk bank would choose to buy infant formula instead 549 if the price of doing so rose. 550 The responders emphasized multiple times the importance of breastmilk for a baby's growth 551 and development, and by implication, the importance of donated breastmilk. The impact of 552 mothers' milk on preterm infants' neurodevelopment was previously demonstrated in a study 553 conducted in the United States [23]. An associated British study found that donor breastmilk 554 is better accepted and less likely to result in necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates 555 [23]. Yet, different worries and opinions on the security of breastmilk from a bank were 556 voiced. The main perceived barrier to the acceptance of breastmilk donor banking among 557 health professionals was the fear of contagious illnesses. There were rumors that an HIV- 558 positive mother could be mistaken for a donor who had tested negative, which could 559 ultimately have an impact on safety of breastmilk. 25 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 561 So, one of the most important tools in eradicating the worry that babies may catch diseases or 562 infections was trust in the breastmilk banking system. In a research to investigate the 563 acceptability of donated breast milk in a resource-constrained South African setting, lack of 564 trust in HIV testing as well as healthcare providers and employees was raised, and this may 565 alter attitudes toward breast milk donation [24]. In this study, misconceptions about the 566 difficulty of feeding infants with donated breastmilk were also noted, including the 567 transmission of infections and the transmission of inherited features or character. Thus, these 568 medical professionals advocated the usage of infant formulae over the strategy of donor 569 breastmilk banking. It was discovered that wet breastfeeding, which was practiced in the past, 570 is no longer a popular practice due to concern over illnesses like HIV. Because of false 571 beliefs regarding the safety of breastmilk, a comparable study carried out in Ethiopia by 572 Gelano et al. revealed that the acceptance of breast milk donor banks and its use for feeding 573 newborns was relatively low[2]. 574 Earlier research also demonstrated that, despite some people's belief that donor breastmilk 575 was safe and that treating it might get rid of HIV and disease-causing organisms, the donor 576 milk's safety posed a significant barrier. Using the milk of another mother causes discomfort 577 and raises concerns regarding the safety of donor breast milk, according to a study done in 578 South Africa by Coutsoudis et al. [24]. Despite this, a small number of the health 579 professionals interviewed were certain that donor screening and breastmilk treatment could 580 completely prevent milk storage contamination. 582 Results also showed that people's reluctance to give breastmilk or accept its use for newborn 583 feeding instead of choosing formula was significantly influenced by religious groups' or 584 churches' activities. Some medical specialists believed that breastmilk donor banks would be 26 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 585 frowned upon by various religious groups and churches. Hence, it was assumed that the 586 behavior would appear improper to members of such churches. In a related study carried out 587 in Ethiopia by Gelano et al., it was also discovered that mothers' reluctance to contribute to a 588 breastmilk bank was partly motivated by their religious beliefs [2]. Notwithstanding the 589 expected difficulties in implementing breastmilk banks in our hospitals, it was determined 590 that the advantages of doing so would outweigh the difficulties. The study's findings also 591 demonstrated that cultural contexts or conventions did not truly provide a barrier to using 592 donated breastmilk to feed newborns. This resulted from the fact that wet nursing is currently 593 practiced in most cultures or previously was. This calls for stakeholder involvement prior to 594 the policy's implementation in Ghana. 596 Health professionals praised the value of depositing breastmilk donors and indicated their 597 pleasure and approval with how breastmilk banks operate. The results demonstrate that health 598 professionals were prepared to use donated breastmilk when necessary and were also 599 prepared to suggest it to families in need due to the significance connected to it. For the most 600 part, respondents said they would be comfortable delivering or recommending it. The desire 601 to assist newborns in need served as the main driving force behind breastmilk donation. The 602 acceptance of the intervention was also aided by health personnel' comprehension of the 603 procedure and the issues the intervention typically resolves. It was clear that the safety of 604 breastmilk donor banking and the understanding of health professionals were key factors in 605 its acceptance. Breast milk donor banking was observed to be acceptable among medical 606 professionals in a comparable study conducted in Zimbabwe [21]. It was discovered that 607 some health professionals 31% said they would give their child donated breastmilk, while the 608 bulk of professionals 56% agreed to advise their customers to donate breastmilk to a bank. 609 Mothers expressed support and desire to give their breastmilk to breastmilk banks in a 27 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 610 different study conducted in South Australia, providing the process is simple and quick[24]. 611 Also, studies showed that moms of newborns who were premature or sickly would use a 612 human milk bank if they were confident the milk was suitable and secure for their kids. To 613 combat the false beliefs people have about safety, education is a vital tool. This 614 recommendation was in line with a number of studies that were done on people's desire to use 615 breastmilk from a breastmilk bank and their willingness to contribute breastmilk to one. 616 Public education on breastmilk banks is required, according to a study by Zhang et al. [22]. It 617 came to the conclusion that information should be shared in the early stages of its 618 establishment. Thus, efforts should be made to improve mothers' awareness of the benefits of 619 breastmilk and nursing. 620 Conclusions 621 Before the study, health professionals had little knowledge about the banking of 622 breastmilk. There were misconceptions regarding its safety, with the biggest 623 obstacle that can affect acceptability being the fear of contracting HIV. Despite 624 this, medical professionals were upbeat and optimistic about the importance of 625 breastmilk banking and its effectiveness in reducing infant mortality and 626 morbidity. When necessary, health professionals were willing to create 627 awareness campaigns about breastmilk banking, give or use recipient families' 628 donated breastmilk, and convince other families to do the same. The safety of 629 breastmilk donor banking must be made known to women, parents, and the 630 general public in order for it to be successfully implemented. Thus, breastmilk 631 donor banking was acknowledged by healthcare professionals at Greater Accra 632 Regional Hospital. 28 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 633 Declarations 634 Acknowledgments 635 The authors wish to thank all the study participants who shared their views with the study. 636 team on the topic. 637 References 638 1. WHO. Breastfeeding. 2021 [cited 20 Dec 2022]. Available: 639 https://www.who.int/health-topics/ breastfeeding#tab=tab_1 640 2. Gelano TF, Bacha YD, Assefa N, Motumma A, Roba AA, Ayele Y, et al. 641 Acceptability of donor breast milk banking, its use for feeding infants, and associated 642 factors among mothers in eastern Ethiopia. Int Breastfeed J. 2018;13: 1–10. 643 doi:10.1186/s13006-018-0163-z 644 3. Beevi S SS, Shanu A, Geethan A, Suryan A, Kumar A, Kumar B, et al. Assessment of 645 Knowledge regarding Human Breast Milk Bank among the Nursing Officers in 646 JIPMER Puducherry. Medicon Med Sci. 2021;1: 13–20. 647 4. Ickes SB, Sanders H, Denno DM, Myhre JA, Kinyua J, Singa B, et al. Exclusive 648 breastfeeding among working mothers in Kenya: Perspectives from women, families 649 and employers. Matern Child Nutr. 2021;17: 1–14. doi:10.1111/mcn.13194 650 5. Appiah PK, Amu H, Osei E, Konlan KD, Mumuni IH, Verner ON, et al. Breastfeeding 651 and weaning practices among mothers in Ghana: A population-based cross-sectional 652 study. PLoS One. 2021;16: 1–19. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0259442 653 6. UNICEF Ghana. Country profile: Key demographic indicators. 2019. Available: 654 https://data.unicef.org/country/gha/ 29 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 655 7. Hoodbhoy S. Human milk banking; current evidence and future challenges. Paediatr 656 Child Heal (United Kingdom). 2013;23: 337–341. doi:10.1016/j.paed.2013.04.001 657 8. Steele S, Martyn J, Foell J. Risks of the unregulated market in human breast milk. 658 BMJ Open. 2015. 659 9. Blanchard E, Zhu P, Schuck P. Infant formula powders. In: Bhandari B, Bansal N, 660 Zhang M, Schuck P, editors. Handbook of Food Powders: Processes and Properties. 661 UK: Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science,; 2013. 662 10. Kair LR, Flaherman VJ, Colaizy TT. Effect of Donor Milk Supplementation on 663 Breastfeeding Outcomes in Term Newborns: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Clin 664 Pediatr (Phila). 2019;58: 534–540. doi:10.1177/0009922819826105 665 11. Gutierrez Dos Santos B, Perrin MT. What is known about human milk bank donors 666 around the world: A systematic scoping review. Public Health Nutr. 2022;25: 312– 667 322. doi:10.1017/S1368980021003979 668 12. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. 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Acceptability of Breast Milk Donor Banking: A qualitative study among Health Workers in Greater Accra Regional Hospital, Ghana

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Abstract

27 Despite the compelling evidence demonstrating the immediate and long-term health 28 advantages of prompt breastfeeding beginning, not all newborns are breastfed exclusively for 29 a variety of reasons. As a result, the World Health Organization has made new 30 recommendations for the adoption of breastmilk donor banks to make sure that children 31 receive breastmilk when mothers are unable to produce it. In order to better understand how 32 health professionals at the Greater Accra Regional Hospital, who would be leading the charge 33 in putting this policy into practice, perceive and accept the practice of storing breastmilk, this 34 study was conducted. At the Greater Accra Regional Hospital, 18 healthcare professionals 35 were chosen using maximum variation purposive sampling procedures. They were made up 36 of eleven midwives, a medical officer, six nurses, and two nutritionists and all participants 37 were interviewed face to face using a semi structured interview guide. Data was transcribed 38 verbatim and was analyzed using thematic analysis. Participants in the study admitted that 39 they would be open to using or contributing to a bank of breastmilk. Participants also said 40 that if safety precautions are taken, they would urge their customers to give breastmilk and 41 recommend breastmilk from a breastmilk bank to them when the situation calls for it. Health 42 professionals recommended that education be provided prior to the installation of breast milk 43 donor banking to lessen or eliminate any misconceptions people may have about it. The 44 concept of breastmilk donor banking was fairly accepted among health workers. 45 Misconceptions about the safety of breast milk was the main concern. The results emphasize 46 the necessity of greater stakeholder engagement and education prior to the implementation of 47 this policy in order to boost acceptance and uptake. 2 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 51 Introduction 53 Breast milk is the safest and most protective food for infants, and it's also the ideal choice for 54 feeding premature and ill babies. For the first six months of life, breastmilk meets all 55 nutritional needs [1]. Also, it shields the youngster from malnutrition and promotes healthy 56 growth. Non-nutrient components of breast milk include immunoglobulins and lactoferrin, 57 which can help in intestinal maturation and adaptation as well as protection from viral and 58 inflammatory illnesses [2]. The World Health Organization (WHO) advises only six months 59 of exclusive breastfeeding. Up until the age of two, supplemental feeding is advised, and after 60 that, it can continue for as long as the mother and child see fit [3] . Exclusive breastfeeding 61 (EBF) is recommended to reduce infant mortality and improve health and cognitive 62 development by preventing infection [4]. 64 Only 42% of the 135 million babies born each year throughout the world receive only breast 65 milk for the first hour, 38% of moms breastfeed exclusively for the first six months, and 58% 66 of mothers exclusively breastfeed their kids until they are two years old [1]. Despite the fact 67 that 98% of Ghanaian women claim to have breastfed their children at some time, infant 68 feeding methods like exclusive breastfeeding and sufficient supplemental feeding are not 69 frequently used [5]. USAID is working in Ghana to promote newborn and young child eating, 70 including nursing practices, as one of many initiatives to lower the high rates of children who 71 are too small for their age or stunted in the nation [6]. Historically and throughout cultures, 72 informal breastfeeding sharing has been reported across cultures [2]. Peer-to-peer milk 73 sharing is frequently done by mothers within their social circle [7]. Peer-to-peer milk sharing 74 has the intention of providing human milk to infants whose parents are unable to provide any 75 or enough milk, but this unregulated practice carries some risk because the milks are not 3 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 76 subjected to any serological testing or screening, which means that diseases like Hepatitis B, 77 syphilis, HIV, and other diseases may not be detected [8]. Human milk is the best food for all 78 newborn humans. Nonetheless, there are several situations where the mother is unable or 79 unwilling to breastfeed. A replacement is necessary in these circumstances [9]. 81 If possible and safe, WHO advises replacement feeding when breastfeeding, especially 82 exclusive breastfeeding, may be hampered. Options for bridging the gap include donor breast 83 milk from a human milk bank and formula feeding. Breast milk banks have been proposed as 84 a means of preserving and donating breast milk to help feed neonates whose mothers are 85 unable to breastfeed owing to several reasons [10]. At least 800,000 children worldwide 86 receive donor human milk each year through breastmilk banking, according to a report by a 87 virtual communication network of leaders in global milk banking from the year 2020 [11]. 88 There are currently 248 Human Milk Banks spread across 26 European countries, according 89 to the European Milk Bank Association (EMBA) [12]. However, the implementation of 90 breastmilk banking has been slow in Africa [8]. 92 According to estimates, only 42% of breastfeeding moms in Ghana continue to do so for the 93 whole 20–23 months, whereas 43% of women exclusively breastfeed for 0–5 months. Even 94 though the Ghanaian government has put rules in place to encourage exclusive breastfeeding, 95 there are still significant obstacles standing in the way of achieving the best possible 96 outcomes for newborn health and wellbeing, necessitating the possibility of breast milk 97 banking. In a previous study, 8% of mothers admitted to ever giving breastmilk to another 98 mother without having the milk screened [13]. As a result, it's critical to investigate the WHO 99 suggestion of donor banking for breastmilk, which offers the chance for the milk to be 4 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 100 checked before use. Nonetheless, the support of important stakeholders like health workers is 101 necessary for the implementation of this strategy. Hence, this study was conducted to explore 102 breast milk donor bank acceptability among health workers in Greater Accra Region of 103 Ghana. 104 Methods and Material 106 Ethical approval 107 The Ghana Health Service Ethics Review Committee (GHS-ERC 030/09/22) granted ethical 108 approval for the study. Also, permission from the Greater Accra Regional Hospital's 109 administration was sought in order to carry out the study. An informed consent document was 110 signed by each study subject. 111 Study design 112 The study relied on a narrative study design [14]. The research was designed to allow 113 participants to express their understandings and perceptions of the meaning and experiences 114 related to the breast milk bank because individuals and groups of people perceive a 115 phenomenon differently [15]. The data for the study was collected among health workers at 116 Greater Accra Regional Hospital. The hospital renders antenatal and delivery services to 117 pregnant women and is a secondary level government hospital supporting the leading referral 118 centre in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, thereby positioning it favourably as the study 119 setting. 120 Theoretical underpinnings of study 121 The acceptability framework created by Sekhon and colleagues [16] was used in the 122 investigation. While planning, carrying out, and putting into practice wellness interventions, 123 acceptance is a crucial factor to consider. Based on predicted or actual cognitive and emotional 5 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 124 responses to the intervention, it is a complex term that reflects the degree to which those 125 delivering or receiving healthcare interventions feel them to be acceptable [16]. The seven 126 component constructs that make up the theoretical framework of acceptability (TFA) are 127 affective attitude, burden, ethicality, intervention coherence, opportunity cost, perceived 128 effectiveness, and self efficacy [16]. 130 Affective attitude examines how a person feels about a particular intervention. The apparent 131 effort needed to take part in an intervention is what is meant by the load. The degree to which 132 the intervention fits well with the person's set of values is what constitutes ethicality. The 133 degree to which participants comprehend the intervention and its mechanism of action is 134 measured by its coherence. Opportunity costs examine whether gains, earnings, or values will 135 be sacrificed while relying on an intervention directly or indirectly. The degree to which an 136 intervention is considered as likely to fulfill its goals is covered by perceived effectiveness, and 137 the participants' self-efficacy is examined by perceived effectiveness and self-efficacy, 138 respectively [16]. These seven principles were combined in determining acceptability of 139 breastmilk donor banking. 141 Study population and sampling 142 Health professionals from Accra's Greater Accra Regional Hospital made up the study's 143 target population. In this investigation, maximum variation purposive sampling was used. To 144 determine which hospital departments are involved in infant feeding, the researchers got in 145 touch with the medical director of the facility. Based on this, the departments were 146 approached to request participant nominations for projects that have a direct bearing on 147 breastfeeding infants. A total of 18 health professionals, including 11 midwives, 4 nurses, 2 6 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 148 nutritionists, and a medical doctor, participated in the study on the basis of data saturation. 149 Before collecting data, consent forms were distributed to health personnel who wished to 150 participate in the study. 152 Data collection tool and procedure 153 An interview guide was used to conduct the in-depth interviews. The interview concentrated 154 on the understanding and attitudes of health professionals on the appropriateness of 155 breastmilk donor banking. One of the main issues was respondents' inclination or 156 unwillingness to recommend families and potential families to give and/or use donated 157 breastmilk, or to donate and/or use donated breastmilk to nourish their needed infants. Also 158 requested was permission to record the interviews. Following each interview, participants' 159 sociodemographic and professional information was collected on a separate form. As a 160 method of participant validation, the interviewer outlined the main points after the interview 161 [17]. An interview session takes 45 to 60 minutes to complete. 162 Data analysis 163 Using version 13 of QSR NVivo, data was examined. For this study, a thematic approach was 164 used. The taped interviews were completely transcribed in order to guarantee credibility and 165 objective results. The data was independently coded, and the transcript was cross-checked. 166 Coding results were examined, and codes were examined for consistency, to assure intercoder 167 concordance [18]. Themes and new issues were established when the codes were jointly 168 reviewed. Themes and topics from the interview guide were initially used to analyze the data. 169 An inductive technique was used to discover additional themes, sub-themes, and patterns in 170 the data [19]. Finally, quotes from the study subjects were used to support the points made. 7 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 171 RESULTS 172 Socio demographics of participants 173 The sociodemographic details of the participants are shown in Table 1. Of the eighteen (18) 174 volunteers gathered for the study, eleven (11) were midwives. There were five nurses, two 175 nutritionists, and one medical doctor. Two (2) men and sixteen (16) women who responded to 176 the survey were the respondents. The responders' average age was close to thirty (30) years. 177 A postgraduate degree was the greatest level of education earned by the respondents, and a 178 diploma was the lowest. Just two (2) of the respondents were Muslims but the majority, were 179 Christians. 180 Table 1: Socio-demographic characteristics of study participants Characteristics Number Percentage (%) Gender Of Respondents Male 16 88.89 Female 2 11.11 Profession Of Respondents Medical Officer 1 5.56 Midwife 11 61.11 Nurse 4 88.89 Nutritionist 2 11.11 Marital Status Married 8 44.44 Never Married 10 55.56 Religion Christian 16 88.89 Islam 2 11.11 Educational Attainment Diploma 5 27.78 Degree 12 66.67 Postgraduate 1 5.56 8 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 182 Themes from Data 183 A summary of the global, main and subthemes that emerged from the data is provided in 184 Table 2. 185 Table 2: Main themes and subthemes Global themes Main themes Sub themes Knowledge about breast milk Knowledge  Knowledge on breastmilk donor donor banking banking Perception of Health workers Safety of breastmilk  Fear of transmission of diseases such regarding breastfeeding and as HIV breast milk donor banking  Fear of transmitting hereditary traits to infants Challenges and concern  Low patronage  Reluctance of mothers to donate  Storage of breastmilk  Risk of infections  Breast milk bank is beneficial Significance of  Reduction of infant mortality breastmilk  Protection against diseases  Activities of some religious and Cultural, ethics and traditional leaders religious considerations  Regulations of certain Christian churches  The practice is ethical The use of infant  Cost formulas against  Preparation for use breastmilk from a  Risks for infants breastmilk bank (Pre NAN etc.)  Health benefits Acceptability of breastmilk Affective Attitude  Excitement donor banking among health  Happy workers Opportunity cost  Loss of bond, attachment Intervention coherence  Participants’ understanding of its operation Perceived effectiveness  Willingness to donate/ reluctance to donate breastmilk  Willingness to use donated donor breastmilk for feeding their infant Things that need to be  Education 9 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . put in place before  Provision of qualified personnel implementation  Motivations 187 Knowledge on breastmilk donor banking 188 Breastmilk donor banking is described by healthcare professionals as the storing of expressed 189 breastmilk for use in feeding other infants. According to a midwife's definition, it has also 190 been used to feed infants whose moms are unable to breastfeed due to medical issues. While 191 some healthcare professionals appeared to be unaware of the logic behind breastmilk donor 192 banking, others were previously familiar with it. These health professionals said that their 193 primary sources of information on breastmilk banks were the school, their peers, and the 194 internet. As supported by these quotations, some definitions given by healthcare professionals 195 regarding the banking of breastmilk were as follows: 196 “I learnt it’s a bank just like the blood bank, where breastmilk is donated by various 197 women, collected, screened (I mean it is passed through various investigations), 198 packaged and stored under certain temperature and made readily available for 199 mothers whom under certain conditions cannot breastfeed their babies.” (Midwife 1) 200 “It is the storing of donated breastmilk from mothers to feed children who have no 201 opportunity to get breastmilk from their biological mothers.” (Midwife 2) 202 One midwife added that she learned about it while the COVID-19 outbreak was going on. 203 The following quotation demonstrates this idea: 204 “To be honest I never knew of such a thing till the COVID-19 time when I learnt in the 205 West, people were donating their breastmilk due to the shortage of formular feeds, 206 that was when I knew you can even do such a thing.” (Midwife, participant 7) 10 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 207 In addition to some medical professionals declaring unequivocally that this is the first time 208 they had heard of it, one midwife made a comparison to other methods of breastfeeding an 209 infant, particularly when they are ill. The following passage supports my point: 210 “No, I don’t know such a thing like that. What I know is like when your child is being 211 admitted to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit), sometimes the mother can’t go there and 212 breastfeed so sometimes, they withdraw the milk into a container so that we feed the 213 babies with those milk.” (Midwife, 5) 215 Perception of health workers regarding breastmilk donor banking 217 Benefits of breastmilk donor banking 218 After the notion was conveyed to health personnel, they agreed that the introduction of 219 breastmilk donor banking is a very good idea. Health professionals acknowledged that not 220 every newborn has the opportunity to get breastmilk due to circumstances making it difficult 221 for the mother to do so, and that the introduction of breastmilk banking will help solve this 222 issue. The quotes that follow emphasize these viewpoints: 224 “I think it’s a good idea because as I said, sometimes when there is loss of life it 225 becomes very difficult for anyone to just get up and breastfeed someone else’s child 226 but if something like this is at play, I feel it’s going to be a very good idea and a very 227 good source for the other babies who are lacking in that aspect to also benefit from 228 the benefits of breastmilk.” (Midwife, 3) 229 “It will benefit the baby and the mother at large. The baby will get all the nutrients 230 required from breastmilk, it will increase the child’s mental and general development 231 and childhood disease and infections would be prevented.” (Midwife, 12) 11 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 232 There was widespread consensus that breast milk banks were beneficial since they will 233 reduce premature mortality, according to the medical community. In light of the advantages, 234 health practitioners generally had positive opinions about breastmilk banks. The quotes below 235 serve to emphasize this: 237 “I will say it will reduce infant mortality of premature babies whose mothers can’t 238 breastfeed or express their milk for use to feed the baby. It will also benefit orphans. 239 It will benefit babies who wouldn’t have mothers’ milk to feed on they will also have 240 the chance to be exclusively breastfed, mothers wouldn’t have to worry about not 241 been able to produce enough breastmilk for their kids, HIV infected mothers wouldn’t 242 have the problem to think about how they are going to breastfeed their infant.” 243 (Nurse, 3) 244 “… It would reduce infant mortality because the introduction to breastmilk in an 245 infant life will protect the child from minor illnesses and will boost the immune system 246 of the child. Breastmilk is the best food for a newly born baby.” (Midwife, 14) 247 The practice of exclusive breastfeeding was a concern for health professionals, particularly 248 those who were mothers, due to their line of work. They said that the necessary six months of 249 exclusive breastfeeding could not be practiced during the three months of maternity leave and 250 that the installation of a breastmilk bank would enable them to breastfeed their children 251 entirely. The quotes that follow further explain this idea: 252 “…our maternity leave is not enough and sometimes expressing the milk too is time 253 consuming for the mothers so if you are lazy or not dedicated, you cannot breastfeed 254 so breastmilk bank will save us from all these…” (Midwife, 1) 12 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 255 “I did not do exclusive breastfeeding for the first two children, I did it for the last one. 256 The first two because the annual leave is almost two months, and the maternity leave 257 is three months, so I couldn’t do it.” (Nurse, 2) 258 “Sometimes the time isn’t enough for us to breastfeed exclusively; even when it comes 259 to expressing the breastmilk to feed your child, it also takes time so if you are not 260 determined to breastfeed your child, then you might end up feeding your baby with the 261 infant formulas which is also expensive and if not prepared well can harm your 262 child.” (Nurse, 4) 263 Donor breastmilk banking was regarded as a moral practice. Health professionals believed 264 that the practice was not novel and that it was appropriate for a community in Ghana. Health 265 professionals noted that in the past, close relatives would wet nurse infants when the original 266 mother was unable to do so. Health professionals emphasized that the introduction of 267 breastmilk donor banking was an advanced form of wet nursing and that the practice had 268 been discontinued owing to the risk of spreading diseases or infections. The quotes that 269 follow demonstrate these ideas: 271 “I would say it’s not against our moral principle. It’s a remedy to a problem so I 272 don’t see anything wrong with it.” (Nurse, 1) 273 “It’s already out there just that it’s among families. My mother told me good stories 274 about it; like you give birth, and you are no more, your mother or anyone that has 275 given birth before can breast feed your child. You just need to stimulate the breast 276 and the milk will come. This is just a means of formalizing it. If my sister gives birth 277 and God forbids, she is no more, ah I will feed the child. People are doing it, I can 278 assure you.” (Nurse, 3) 13 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 279 “In the olden days when someone delivers and dies or maybe is sick and there is a 280 relative or a friend who has delivered, the person can breastfeed the child; but now 281 fear of infections and all that, like STI….” (Nurse 2) 282 Christian and Muslim health professionals who were asked if their faith would prevent them 283 from accepting breastmilk donor banks gave good responses. However, several medical 284 professionals expressed worry that some Christian churches, whose names have been 285 omitted, would not endorse it even though they are in favor. The following accounts lend 286 credence to these opinions: 288 “Religiously I think maybe the same group of people who have problem with the 289 blood bank is the same people who will have issues with the breastmilk donor banking 290 but personally my religion will not frown on it.” (Nurse 2, Christian) 291 “… my religion will tell me that anything that will benefit you it doesn’t prevent it so 292 religiously my religion wouldn’t prevent me.” (Nurse 3, Muslim) 293 “I don’t think I would have any problem with that personally and religiously as well 294 because it’s something that’s going to benefit the child and not going to harm the 295 child so religiously, I don’t think there should be a problem with that.” (Midwife 3, 296 Muslim) 297 Risk of infections from contaminated breastmilk 298 Despite the fact that the health professionals thought the intervention was effective, some 299 people believed that given a baby's immunization, it wasn't safe to use it to feed them. Infant 300 feeding safety issues as well as the possibility that children could acquire genetic or inherited 301 features from unknowing donors, including the danger of HIV infection, were highlighted. 302 The quotes below demonstrate this position: 14 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 304 “Genetically I don’t know what is within that breastmilk production, you know, there 305 might be cancer cells in that breastmilk that I am feeding because it’s been produced 306 by another mother and you know everything is made up of cells so it is cells that are 307 generating all these things, so if it’s generating something like that, I don’t know 308 whether there are traces of cancer cells in that person’s family or something like a 309 genetic disease or something. It’s been screened o, but deep down it’s not 100% 310 safe.” (Midwife 10) 311 “It is a good intervention I will say but where I am reluctant or where I am holding 312 back is, will it be safe? As in will it be hygienic and free from diseases like HIV? Are 313 we having the resources to operate it in Ghana? It will be safe when it is screened for 314 infections so that it doesn’t cause harm to the infant.” (Nurse 4) 315 Health professionals emphasized that there would be no cause for concern if only the donors 316 and breastmilk were screened for illnesses to make it safe. The narratives that follow support 317 this assertion: 318 “So far as they will be screened for its safety, then it is good because there are people 319 who are not healthy to do so but so far as it would be screened then it is a good 320 initiative because breastmilk contains essential nutrients.” (Midwife, 12) 321 “I was doubting because I don’t think it would be safe for me to come and take 322 breastmilk to feed my child in case of anything but if it undergoes processes and if all 323 other things concerning its safety can be taken care of then there is nothing wrong 324 about it.” (Midwife, 9) 325 A medical official who agreed that breastmilk should be checked for safety said that health 326 professionals are also susceptible to making mistakes, such as wrongly declaring an HIV 15 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 327 positive donor negative, which might have a significant detrimental impact on an unborn 328 child. The following assertion demonstrates this: 329 “Fine it will go through some processes, mothers would be screened and all that but 330 in the medical field too we tend to be negligent sometimes. You might mistake 331 somebody’s report for another’s; let’s say if a mother is retro positive and then the 332 person goes to donate milk and we mix the report with another person’s own thinking 333 the mother is negative, what have you done to the baby? You have automatically 334 infected the baby with HIV so when it comes to the medical side it is a no no. I also 335 think it is not really necessary in this part of the world because we do well when it 336 comes to breastfeeding.” (Medical Officer 1) 337 Preference for donor breastmilk versus artificial formula 338 Health professionals emphasized that in terms of health benefits, artificial formulas fall well 339 short of breastmilk. Respondents claimed that poor preparation of formula had a detrimental 340 impact on newborns. Health professionals believed that, despite the cost of saved breastmilk, 341 it wouldn't be as expensive as infant formula. These respondents' opinions are illustrated by 342 the quotes that follow: 343 “Compared to formula feeds, breastmilk has a lot more nutrients than formula feeds. 344 The feeds have some side effects of formula feedings including allergy and 345 constipation. The cost of artificial formula is high. Even though donor milk will cost 346 money, I don't think it will cost much more than artificial formulas.” (Midwife, 12) 347 “… breastmilk is highly nutritious than infant formulas; what role breastmilk plays 348 cannot be compared to artificial formulas. It contains antibodies and other nutrients 349 that help fight against diseases so health wise the breastmilk will be better in terms of 350 this aspect and that’s what we want to achieve.” (Midwife, 7) 16 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 351 “With the artificial formulas, I don’t think it is the best because it does not contain the 352 necessary nutrients as compared to the breastmilk so with the artificial formulas, I 353 myself I don’t even like it when babies are giving artificial formulas.” (Midwife, 10) 354 There were two perspectives on how convenient donor breastmilk or baby formulae were. 355 Regarding saving time, several of the responders thought donor breastmilk was more 356 practical because it didn't require preparation time, unlike artificial formulas that needed 357 boiling water and clean bowls and spoons to avoid contaminating the feed. Some experts took 358 accessibility into account when deciding on the convenience. Formula feeds were thought to 359 be more approachable in that regard. Breastmilk from a donor bank is more practical when 360 decisions are made based on potential health advantages. The following narratives serve as 361 examples of these viewpoints: 363 “The breast milk or the breastmilk bank is convenient because you are not going to 364 prepare it, you are just going to take and give; but with the artificial you are now 365 going to prepare it. You need to look at the instructions, put water (boiled water hot 366 cold, you know) and you either add more milk, less water or vice versa. But with the 367 breast milk you just take it and you are giving it to the baby.” (Nurse 3) 368 “With the convenience, the formula feeds will be convenient because it can be found 369 in most shops to buy but with the donor breastmilk you will have to go to a breastmilk 370 bank before you can get access to it.” (Nurse 2) 371 “There is no doubt that breastmilk is the best and it cannot be compared to formulas 372 irrespective of its cost and convenience but as Ghanaians we will prefer something 373 accessible and less expensive. So if the donor breastmilk is in existence and it’s also 17 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 374 going for a cost, mothers or families would prefer the formulas because for the 375 formulas it’s all over stores and you can get it anytime.” (Medical Officer 1) 376 Challenges health workers anticipate with regards to breast milk donor banking 377 The primary difficulty that health experts anticipated was the safety of donor breastmilk to 378 feed newborns. They believed that people would continue to wonder if donated human milk 379 would be safe to give to infants. Also, they expressed their uncertainty as to whether moms 380 would feel the use of stored breastmilk to be suitable. The following statements provide 381 examples of these viewpoints: 382 “People will be concerned about the safety of the breastmilk; medically, had the 383 breastmilk gone through screening? Is it safe? Would the baby get some form of, 384 probably condition or diseases, should in case the donor have those conditions, like 385 would there be some form of transfers that will affects the child’s health?” 386 (Nutritionist, 1) 387 “I think the concern people might raise more is you not knowing the person the 388 breastmilk is from, people not being sure. You said you are screening, are you sure 389 you screened it? And then the conditions, the hygienic condition; I think these are the 390 things people would raise concerns about.” (Midwife, 2) 391 “People will also be concerned about the safety of it whether it has really undergone 392 some level of screening to make it safe. So, if they are 100% sure that the breastmilk 393 does not contain any infections and that when given to my baby it wouldn’t harm him 394 or her.” (Midwife, 10) 395 Health professionals also expected that mothers could be reluctant to give breastmilk to a 396 bank, which might lead to shortages and undermine the bank's success. As we don't have 18 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 397 enough competent workers, some health professionals expressed concern that its safety would 398 be at risk. The quotes that follow emphasize these ideas: 399 “The operation of donor milk banking will depend on mothers donating breastmilk to 400 the bank so if in future mothers feel reluctant to donate, the operation wouldn’t 401 achieve its purpose.” (Midwife 8) 402 “I feel it would be hard to get donors because this is not the need now in our 403 hospitals and maybe certain cultural beliefs will also hinder people from patronizing 404 it. I also feel its safety would be compromised because we don’t have the personnel, I 405 mean the technical know-how to handle a breastmilk bank. Even when it’s been 406 operated, the bond between mother and child might be lost.” (Medical Officer, 1) 407 “There can be shortage of breastmilk when it becomes rooted, and everybody is 408 purchasing, and we are not getting people to replace the breast milk.” (Midwife,1) 410 Some medical professionals were also concerned about how breastmilk is stored and how 411 long it may be kept in the breast bank before becoming bad. The following quotations support 412 this claim: 414 “…how long will be breastmilk be stored because even if we have donors and people 415 don’t come for the breastmilk the milk might go waste.” (Midwife 8) 416 “How long can it be stored without the milk going bad? If mothers are given enough 417 breastmilk to take home, can our normal refrigerator store it? If yes, at what 418 temperature? Will mothers avail themselves to donate at a breastmilk bank?” 419 (Midwife, 6) 19 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 420 Health professionals also predicted that a difficulty to the complete implementation of 421 breastmilk banking in Ghana would be funding and the sustainability of breast banks. Some 422 examples support this viewpoint: 423 “I think that we do not have the resources unless we are getting the support from 424 maybe international bodies. Funding can be a problem and after getting it done 425 sustainability can also be a problem.” (Midwife, 6) 426 “Some of the challenges will be the source of funding. Looking at our current 427 economy, I am wondering if this would be possible. Aside from the funding, people 428 will still be worried about whether it is safe for feeding infants. Will mothers come out 429 in their numbers to donate?” (Midwife, 3) 430 Acceptance of breastmilk donor banking 431 Health professionals who could explain the advantages to potential clients were generally in 432 favor of the idea of breastmilk donor banking. Participants were excited about the idea of 433 breastmilk banking and gushed about how it would help moms in their quest to feed their 434 babies by saving them time and money. The sentiment expressed by medical professionals 435 concerning the creation of breastmilk donor banks is exemplified by the quotes below: 436 “I’m very excited about this. I feel is a good plan, it should come, and it should stay. I 437 am positive about this- I hope it works out.” (Midwife, 3) 438 “I will be really excited to see it being implemented here in this hospital. As I said, 439 it’s going to help a lot because there are instances where people must go outside to go 440 and feed their baby. So, with this it’s going to help these mothers a lot; it will save 441 money and time.” (Nurse, 3) 20 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 442 The study's findings also demonstrated that establishing a breast milk bank in Ghana would 443 be successful in the long run. Health professionals predicted that it wouldn't be simple to 444 maintain it at first, but that it would eventually succeed. 445 “It would work as long as the organizations are willing to support, and mothers are 446 willing to offer themselves as point of donors it will work but it will come with its own 447 resistance. Even if it doesn’t work at the first trial and those gaps that made it not to 448 work are fixed then with time it would work.” (Nutritionist, 1) 449 “It will work. Starting something is difficult but if people notice its benefit, they will 450 accept it.” (Midwife, 7) 451 “… there are some people who will accept it and there are some who will not accept 452 it. We must start and see the way forward because I believe that interventions are not 453 meant for everyone because there are some people who will be in dire need of it and 454 those people will accept and patronize it.” (Midwife, 12) 456 When the necessity arose, health professionals expressed their willingness to donate and/or 457 use donated breastmilk to feed their infants. Health professionals were also willing to advise 458 individuals in need to use donated breastmilk to feed their infants when necessary and to urge 459 moms who have extra milk to give it to a breastmilk bank. The quotes below demonstrate 460 these ideas: 462 “If I’m in the place to donate fine and if there is someone who can donate too, I think 463 I will advise because if it helps another child, why not?” (Midwife, 9) 464 “Yes, I will. Once it’s going to help the baby and the mother, I will, and I will also 465 advice someone to do it.” (Midwife, 4) 21 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 466 “For me, at the moment I have finish giving birth so I don’t think I will have any, but 467 I’m willing to advice other women or colleagues to participate if they have enough to 468 give.” (Midwife, 8) 469 While some healthcare professionals held the opinion that if they had an excess supply of 470 breastmilk, they would donate it to a breast bank and advise women without medical 471 conditions to do the same, others emphasized that they would only do so if the security of the 472 breastmilk banking can be ensured. 473 “If there are reports that the safety of it has been compromised, I wouldn’t keep 474 recommending it to people. If the safety of it is compromised, then there is no point of 475 buying something that is not worth the quality.” (Nutritionist, 1) 476 “If the donor is ill and doesn’t have the strength to donate, I will not advise; aside 477 that I don’t think something will prevent me from recommending it.” (Nurse, 3) 478 Pre-implementation preparations 479 All of the healthcare professionals agreed that the key strategies for making this intervention 480 successful were education and training. From the planning stage through the implementation 481 stage, education was advised at every stage. Health professionals believed that the only way 482 to dispel myths and misconceptions about breast milk banks was via education. Before 483 beginning this intervention, health professionals recognized the need to educate stakeholders, 484 moms, couples, and the general public. Stakeholders should be involved at the planning 485 stage, according to health professionals. The following quotations serve as examples of these 486 viewpoints: 487 “…the public should be educated about it. It is very necessary because it’s going to 488 eliminate their negative perception about it especially about the safety of it.” 489 (Midwife, 1) 22 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 490 “There should be consistent education on it, through the media, opinion leaders, 491 churches, the community should be involved, and this will make it easier for it to be 492 implemented. The community should also be assured of the safety of the donor milk.” 493 (Midwife, 5) 494 “There should be qualified personnel that would be in charge of it, there should be 495 intensive education to the public concerning its operation and the processes 496 breastmilk would go through because it is something new.” (Midwife, 12) 497 Health professionals also suggested ways to reward moms who agree to give breastmilk to a 498 bank. They believed that rewards in the form of incentives could inspire or uplift the spirits of 499 moms who have extra breast milk and want to donate it to a breastmilk bank. They viewed 500 this drive as a tool to persuade moms with extra milk to voluntarily offer it to a breastmilk 501 bank as a donation. The quotes below demonstrate these ideas: 502 If the nearest donor facility is at Korle Bu and I am here at Ridge I will not pick a car 503 and go so the government, WHO, UNICEF and other bodies should heavily subsidize it 504 and maybe compensate mothers who donate their milk.” (Nurse, 3) 505 “I wouldn’t donate if I won’t be given any supplement to replace the energy I used to 506 donate [laughs]. Yes, at least donors should be compensated. I think with this, mothers 507 would feel encouraged to donate to a breast bank.” (Midwife, 1) 508 Finally, health professionals underlined the need to involve stakeholders in the development 509 of a policy to direct and regulate the nation's breast milk bank before implementation, as seen 510 in the following example: 511 “There is a need for stakeholders’ engagements before implementation. This would be 512 an initial good step. In addition to that we need to develop a policy to guide the 23 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 513 process. Otherwise, you may several people setting up breastmilk banks because fo 514 monetary gains” (Medical Officer 1) 515 DISCUSSION 516 This qualitative study looked at how well-liked breast milk donor banking is among medical 517 professionals. The study makes it clear that some health professionals initially did not think 518 this study was necessary because they knew little to nothing about breastmilk donor banks. 519 Hence, there was very little initial acceptance among these health professionals; nevertheless, 520 after being explained the basic idea behind breastmilk donor banking, the majority of the 521 professionals displayed a favorable attitude. It sent a message that someone might dismiss an 522 intervention if they have little or no awareness about it. Health professionals who were 523 familiar with the practice of wet nursing also acquired a favorable perspective on the 524 activities of breastmilk donor banking. This was due to the fact that these health professionals 525 equated breastfeeding a newborn with the milk of a close friend or family with the practice of 526 breastmilk donor banking. Health professionals who said they were aware of and 527 knowledgeable with breastmilk donor banking were able to define it correctly. Colleagues 528 and educational institutions were cited as the primary sources of information. The study 529 found that understanding breast milk donor banking has a beneficial impact on people's 530 acceptance of its practice. This outcome from the current study is supported by research done 531 years earlier. A Brazilian study found that donating human milk for primary healthcare was 532 strongly correlated with knowledge of milk expression [20]. According to a related study by 533 Chagwena et al., having in-depth knowledge of breastmilk banks was associated with 534 acceptance of donor human milk banking [21]. The main obstacles preventing postpartum 535 women from donating or accepting donor milk, according to Zhang et al., are a lack of 536 knowledge regarding breastmilk donor banks and its safety [22]. 24 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 538 The study also revealed that health professionals believed the establishment of breastmilk 539 banks in Ghanaian hospitals was an excellent concept and a great way for newborns who are 540 lacking in that area to still benefit from breastmilk. According to the study, feeding needy 541 children donor breastmilk will lower infant mortality and morbidity because the babies will 542 have ready access to food, reducing the risk of infections. It was believed that giving a needy 543 baby breastmilk from a bank would enhance the percentage of exclusive breastfeeding, hence 544 preventing disease and mortality, because health practitioners emphasized how healthy 545 breastmilk is. According to the study, health professionals believe that obtaining breastmilk 546 from a bank is preferable than using infant formula because the latter exposes babies to 547 diseases when it is not produced hygienically. Yet, it was found that moms who couldn't 548 afford to buy breastmilk from a breastmilk bank would choose to buy infant formula instead 549 if the price of doing so rose. 550 The responders emphasized multiple times the importance of breastmilk for a baby's growth 551 and development, and by implication, the importance of donated breastmilk. The impact of 552 mothers' milk on preterm infants' neurodevelopment was previously demonstrated in a study 553 conducted in the United States [23]. An associated British study found that donor breastmilk 554 is better accepted and less likely to result in necrotizing enterocolitis in premature neonates 555 [23]. Yet, different worries and opinions on the security of breastmilk from a bank were 556 voiced. The main perceived barrier to the acceptance of breastmilk donor banking among 557 health professionals was the fear of contagious illnesses. There were rumors that an HIV- 558 positive mother could be mistaken for a donor who had tested negative, which could 559 ultimately have an impact on safety of breastmilk. 25 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 561 So, one of the most important tools in eradicating the worry that babies may catch diseases or 562 infections was trust in the breastmilk banking system. In a research to investigate the 563 acceptability of donated breast milk in a resource-constrained South African setting, lack of 564 trust in HIV testing as well as healthcare providers and employees was raised, and this may 565 alter attitudes toward breast milk donation [24]. In this study, misconceptions about the 566 difficulty of feeding infants with donated breastmilk were also noted, including the 567 transmission of infections and the transmission of inherited features or character. Thus, these 568 medical professionals advocated the usage of infant formulae over the strategy of donor 569 breastmilk banking. It was discovered that wet breastfeeding, which was practiced in the past, 570 is no longer a popular practice due to concern over illnesses like HIV. Because of false 571 beliefs regarding the safety of breastmilk, a comparable study carried out in Ethiopia by 572 Gelano et al. revealed that the acceptance of breast milk donor banks and its use for feeding 573 newborns was relatively low[2]. 574 Earlier research also demonstrated that, despite some people's belief that donor breastmilk 575 was safe and that treating it might get rid of HIV and disease-causing organisms, the donor 576 milk's safety posed a significant barrier. Using the milk of another mother causes discomfort 577 and raises concerns regarding the safety of donor breast milk, according to a study done in 578 South Africa by Coutsoudis et al. [24]. Despite this, a small number of the health 579 professionals interviewed were certain that donor screening and breastmilk treatment could 580 completely prevent milk storage contamination. 582 Results also showed that people's reluctance to give breastmilk or accept its use for newborn 583 feeding instead of choosing formula was significantly influenced by religious groups' or 584 churches' activities. Some medical specialists believed that breastmilk donor banks would be 26 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 585 frowned upon by various religious groups and churches. Hence, it was assumed that the 586 behavior would appear improper to members of such churches. In a related study carried out 587 in Ethiopia by Gelano et al., it was also discovered that mothers' reluctance to contribute to a 588 breastmilk bank was partly motivated by their religious beliefs [2]. Notwithstanding the 589 expected difficulties in implementing breastmilk banks in our hospitals, it was determined 590 that the advantages of doing so would outweigh the difficulties. The study's findings also 591 demonstrated that cultural contexts or conventions did not truly provide a barrier to using 592 donated breastmilk to feed newborns. This resulted from the fact that wet nursing is currently 593 practiced in most cultures or previously was. This calls for stakeholder involvement prior to 594 the policy's implementation in Ghana. 596 Health professionals praised the value of depositing breastmilk donors and indicated their 597 pleasure and approval with how breastmilk banks operate. The results demonstrate that health 598 professionals were prepared to use donated breastmilk when necessary and were also 599 prepared to suggest it to families in need due to the significance connected to it. For the most 600 part, respondents said they would be comfortable delivering or recommending it. The desire 601 to assist newborns in need served as the main driving force behind breastmilk donation. The 602 acceptance of the intervention was also aided by health personnel' comprehension of the 603 procedure and the issues the intervention typically resolves. It was clear that the safety of 604 breastmilk donor banking and the understanding of health professionals were key factors in 605 its acceptance. Breast milk donor banking was observed to be acceptable among medical 606 professionals in a comparable study conducted in Zimbabwe [21]. It was discovered that 607 some health professionals 31% said they would give their child donated breastmilk, while the 608 bulk of professionals 56% agreed to advise their customers to donate breastmilk to a bank. 609 Mothers expressed support and desire to give their breastmilk to breastmilk banks in a 27 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 610 different study conducted in South Australia, providing the process is simple and quick[24]. 611 Also, studies showed that moms of newborns who were premature or sickly would use a 612 human milk bank if they were confident the milk was suitable and secure for their kids. To 613 combat the false beliefs people have about safety, education is a vital tool. This 614 recommendation was in line with a number of studies that were done on people's desire to use 615 breastmilk from a breastmilk bank and their willingness to contribute breastmilk to one. 616 Public education on breastmilk banks is required, according to a study by Zhang et al. [22]. It 617 came to the conclusion that information should be shared in the early stages of its 618 establishment. Thus, efforts should be made to improve mothers' awareness of the benefits of 619 breastmilk and nursing. 620 Conclusions 621 Before the study, health professionals had little knowledge about the banking of 622 breastmilk. There were misconceptions regarding its safety, with the biggest 623 obstacle that can affect acceptability being the fear of contracting HIV. Despite 624 this, medical professionals were upbeat and optimistic about the importance of 625 breastmilk banking and its effectiveness in reducing infant mortality and 626 morbidity. When necessary, health professionals were willing to create 627 awareness campaigns about breastmilk banking, give or use recipient families' 628 donated breastmilk, and convince other families to do the same. The safety of 629 breastmilk donor banking must be made known to women, parents, and the 630 general public in order for it to be successfully implemented. Thus, breastmilk 631 donor banking was acknowledged by healthcare professionals at Greater Accra 632 Regional Hospital. 28 medRxiv preprint doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2023.04.11.23288411; this version posted April 17, 2023. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not certified by peer review) is the author/funder, who has granted medRxiv a license to display the preprint in perpetuity. It is made available under a CC-BY 4.0 International license . 633 Declarations 634 Acknowledgments 635 The authors wish to thank all the study participants who shared their views with the study. 636 team on the topic. 637 References 638 1. WHO. Breastfeeding. 2021 [cited 20 Dec 2022]. Available: 639 https://www.who.int/health-topics/ breastfeeding#tab=tab_1 640 2. Gelano TF, Bacha YD, Assefa N, Motumma A, Roba AA, Ayele Y, et al. 641 Acceptability of donor breast milk banking, its use for feeding infants, and associated 642 factors among mothers in eastern Ethiopia. Int Breastfeed J. 2018;13: 1–10. 643 doi:10.1186/s13006-018-0163-z 644 3. Beevi S SS, Shanu A, Geethan A, Suryan A, Kumar A, Kumar B, et al. Assessment of 645 Knowledge regarding Human Breast Milk Bank among the Nursing Officers in 646 JIPMER Puducherry. Medicon Med Sci. 2021;1: 13–20. 647 4. Ickes SB, Sanders H, Denno DM, Myhre JA, Kinyua J, Singa B, et al. 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