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Variables Influencing Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Patients

Variables Influencing Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Patients Variables Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Influencing Patients By Rinda Alexander, Ph.D., R.N., and Joyce Fitzpatrick, M.S., R.N. respond to AIDS patients perspective of personal values, beliefs, and experiences. Many nurses continue to have negative versely, other studies have not documented a significant decrease in the fears and anxieties of nurses after they attended continuing education programs on AIDS. For example, Blumenfield et al.4 found that of the nurses they surveyed (n=107) continuing education programs. In such continuing education program, Flaskerud incorporated attitude examination exercises, discussion groups and role into one Nurses from a attitudes toward individuals who have AIDS.12 Although many variables seem to influence nurses' negative attitudes toward AIDS patients, three common themes emerge from the literature: (1) fear of contracting AIDS or contagion, (2) value judgments about PWAs, (3) negative reactions by nurses' families and friends toward AIDS.3 in 1983, 59 percent believed AIDS could be transmitted to hospital personnel because of contact with patients, and 55 percent believed they could develop AIDS from contacting clinical specimens, modeling.11 Significant pretest/posttest changes in both knowledge and attitudes documented. were Value Judgments A second influence on nurses' attitudes toward AIDS cited in the literature is their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Variables Influencing Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Patients

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Variables Influencing Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Patients

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Abstract

Variables Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Influencing Patients By Rinda Alexander, Ph.D., R.N., and Joyce Fitzpatrick, M.S., R.N. respond to AIDS patients perspective of personal values, beliefs, and experiences. Many nurses continue to have negative versely, other studies have not documented a significant decrease in the fears and anxieties of nurses after they attended continuing education programs on AIDS. For example, Blumenfield et al.4 found that of the nurses they surveyed (n=107) continuing education programs. In such continuing education program, Flaskerud incorporated attitude examination exercises, discussion groups and role into one Nurses from a attitudes toward individuals who have AIDS.12 Although many variables seem to influence nurses' negative attitudes toward AIDS patients, three common themes emerge from the literature: (1) fear of contracting AIDS or contagion, (2) value judgments about PWAs, (3) negative reactions by nurses' families and friends toward AIDS.3 in 1983, 59 percent believed AIDS could be transmitted to hospital personnel because of contact with patients, and 55 percent believed they could develop AIDS from contacting clinical specimens, modeling.11 Significant pretest/posttest changes in both knowledge and attitudes documented. were Value Judgments A second influence on nurses' attitudes toward AIDS cited in the literature is their

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1991.5.315
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Variables Nurses' Attitudes Toward AIDS and AIDS Influencing Patients By Rinda Alexander, Ph.D., R.N., and Joyce Fitzpatrick, M.S., R.N. respond to AIDS patients perspective of personal values, beliefs, and experiences. Many nurses continue to have negative versely, other studies have not documented a significant decrease in the fears and anxieties of nurses after they attended continuing education programs on AIDS. For example, Blumenfield et al.4 found that of the nurses they surveyed (n=107) continuing education programs. In such continuing education program, Flaskerud incorporated attitude examination exercises, discussion groups and role into one Nurses from a attitudes toward individuals who have AIDS.12 Although many variables seem to influence nurses' negative attitudes toward AIDS patients, three common themes emerge from the literature: (1) fear of contracting AIDS or contagion, (2) value judgments about PWAs, (3) negative reactions by nurses' families and friends toward AIDS.3 in 1983, 59 percent believed AIDS could be transmitted to hospital personnel because of contact with patients, and 55 percent believed they could develop AIDS from contacting clinical specimens, modeling.11 Significant pretest/posttest changes in both knowledge and attitudes documented. were Value Judgments A second influence on nurses' attitudes toward AIDS cited in the literature is their

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1991

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