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The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management

The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management such as a a By Richard A. Elion, M.D. focus of research on AIDS has almost exclusively been limited to "medical" concerns, such as isolat¬ ing and identifying an infectious agent and determining which demographic and lifestyle variables are risk factors for infection. More recently, however, researchers have become aware that a broader perspective is necessary. work, The loss of emotional control—the ability to externalize negative feelings, the will to live, and the ability to adjust to the threats and changes brought on by the disease process have all been linked to survival. close-knit social support net¬ strong "hostile" drive—without Physician-Patient Interaction Key While AIDS patients and their physi¬ cians recognize that many factors con¬ tribute to long-term survival, they often single out a strong relationship between physician and patient. In fact, the tenor of the physician-patient interactions can influence physiological measures, such as blood pressure or blood sugar, and over¬ all health status.1 Practitioners can shape their patients' attitude towards their dis¬ ease and ideas about their ability to influ¬ ence its effect on their lives. Effective interchange between the physician and Consequently, psychosocial parameters on disease progression are attracting increasing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 6 (6) – Dec 1, 1992

The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 6 (6) – Dec 1, 1992

Abstract

The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management such as a a By Richard A. Elion, M.D. focus of research on AIDS has almost exclusively been limited to "medical" concerns, such as isolat¬ ing and identifying an infectious agent and determining which demographic and lifestyle variables are risk factors for infection. More recently, however, researchers have become aware that a broader perspective is necessary. work, The loss of emotional control—the ability to externalize negative feelings, the will to live, and the ability to adjust to the threats and changes brought on by the disease process have all been linked to survival. close-knit social support net¬ strong "hostile" drive—without Physician-Patient Interaction Key While AIDS patients and their physi¬ cians recognize that many factors con¬ tribute to long-term survival, they often single out a strong relationship between physician and patient. In fact, the tenor of the physician-patient interactions can influence physiological measures, such as blood pressure or blood sugar, and over¬ all health status.1 Practitioners can shape their patients' attitude towards their dis¬ ease and ideas about their ability to influ¬ ence its effect on their lives. Effective interchange between the physician and Consequently, psychosocial parameters on disease progression are attracting increasing

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1992 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1992.6.273
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Physician-Patient Relationship in AIDS Management such as a a By Richard A. Elion, M.D. focus of research on AIDS has almost exclusively been limited to "medical" concerns, such as isolat¬ ing and identifying an infectious agent and determining which demographic and lifestyle variables are risk factors for infection. More recently, however, researchers have become aware that a broader perspective is necessary. work, The loss of emotional control—the ability to externalize negative feelings, the will to live, and the ability to adjust to the threats and changes brought on by the disease process have all been linked to survival. close-knit social support net¬ strong "hostile" drive—without Physician-Patient Interaction Key While AIDS patients and their physi¬ cians recognize that many factors con¬ tribute to long-term survival, they often single out a strong relationship between physician and patient. In fact, the tenor of the physician-patient interactions can influence physiological measures, such as blood pressure or blood sugar, and over¬ all health status.1 Practitioners can shape their patients' attitude towards their dis¬ ease and ideas about their ability to influ¬ ence its effect on their lives. Effective interchange between the physician and Consequently, psychosocial parameters on disease progression are attracting increasing

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1992

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