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Synergistic Antiproliferative and Anticancer Activity of Carotenoid Lutein or Coenzyme Q10 in Combination with Doxorubicin on the MCF7 Cell Line

Synergistic Antiproliferative and Anticancer Activity of Carotenoid Lutein or Coenzyme Q10 in... Introduction: As a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX) is limited because of systemic toxicities. Repeated treatment with DOX reduces the therapeutic response and increases cellular resistance to the drug. Carotenoids are highly efficient in preventing and treating cancer. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone has a dynamic role in electron transfer within the mitochondrial oxidative respiratory chain. This study aimed to evaluate the synergistic activity of different concentrations of carotenoid lutein (CL) and CoQ10 combined with doxorubicin on the MCF7 cell line.Materials and Methods: Evaluation of cancer cell growth inhibition by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, free radical scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) test with DCFH reagent, measurement of membrane lipid damage by lipid peroxidation test with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reagent, and measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic antioxidants were performed using the ZellBio kit.Results and Discussion: Compared with the doxorubicin group, CoQ10 and lutein at high concentrations significantly reduced cancer cell growth by 65% and 60.19%, respectively (p < 0.01). A significant decrease in GPx and SOD enzyme activities was observed with 10 μg/mL CoQ10 (by 66.52% and 63.55%) and lutein (by 64.50% and 66.20%), (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01), respectively. CoQ10 and lutein at 10 μg/mL increased the level of malondialdehyde by 76.66% and 76.80%, respectively (MDA; p < 0.001). CoQ10 and lutein treatment groups at 10 μg/mL significantly increased intracellular ROS by 58.32% and 57.49%, respectively (p < 0.001). Cancer cells' metabolism is higher than normal cells, associated with increased oxidative stress. The increase in oxidative stress is correlated with a decrease in cell viability, which indicates the role of oxidative damage in the cancer cell line.Conclusions: This study suggests that using supplements such as CL and CoQ10 may help reduce cancer cell growth as adjunctive therapy with doxorubicin. As shown in this study, the use of high-dose supplements can cause oxidative stress and inhibit the growth of cancer cells by inducing ROS and reducing antioxidants and it benefits the therapeutic process by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied In Vitro Toxicology Mary Ann Liebert

Synergistic Antiproliferative and Anticancer Activity of Carotenoid Lutein or Coenzyme Q10 in Combination with Doxorubicin on the MCF7 Cell Line

Synergistic Antiproliferative and Anticancer Activity of Carotenoid Lutein or Coenzyme Q10 in Combination with Doxorubicin on the MCF7 Cell Line

Applied In Vitro Toxicology , Volume 7 (4): 8 – Dec 1, 2021

Abstract

Introduction: As a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX) is limited because of systemic toxicities. Repeated treatment with DOX reduces the therapeutic response and increases cellular resistance to the drug. Carotenoids are highly efficient in preventing and treating cancer. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone has a dynamic role in electron transfer within the mitochondrial oxidative respiratory chain. This study aimed to evaluate the synergistic activity of different concentrations of carotenoid lutein (CL) and CoQ10 combined with doxorubicin on the MCF7 cell line.Materials and Methods: Evaluation of cancer cell growth inhibition by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, free radical scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) test with DCFH reagent, measurement of membrane lipid damage by lipid peroxidation test with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reagent, and measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic antioxidants were performed using the ZellBio kit.Results and Discussion: Compared with the doxorubicin group, CoQ10 and lutein at high concentrations significantly reduced cancer cell growth by 65% and 60.19%, respectively (p < 0.01). A significant decrease in GPx and SOD enzyme activities was observed with 10 μg/mL CoQ10 (by 66.52% and 63.55%) and lutein (by 64.50% and 66.20%), (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01), respectively. CoQ10 and lutein at 10 μg/mL increased the level of malondialdehyde by 76.66% and 76.80%, respectively (MDA; p < 0.001). CoQ10 and lutein treatment groups at 10 μg/mL significantly increased intracellular ROS by 58.32% and 57.49%, respectively (p < 0.001). Cancer cells' metabolism is higher than normal cells, associated with increased oxidative stress. The increase in oxidative stress is correlated with a decrease in cell viability, which indicates the role of oxidative damage in the cancer cell line.Conclusions: This study suggests that using supplements such as CL and CoQ10 may help reduce cancer cell growth as adjunctive therapy with doxorubicin. As shown in this study, the use of high-dose supplements can cause oxidative stress and inhibit the growth of cancer cells by inducing ROS and reducing antioxidants and it benefits the therapeutic process by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 2021, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers
ISSN
2332-1512
eISSN
2332-1539
DOI
10.1089/aivt.2021.0008
Publisher site
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Abstract

Introduction: As a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX) is limited because of systemic toxicities. Repeated treatment with DOX reduces the therapeutic response and increases cellular resistance to the drug. Carotenoids are highly efficient in preventing and treating cancer. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone has a dynamic role in electron transfer within the mitochondrial oxidative respiratory chain. This study aimed to evaluate the synergistic activity of different concentrations of carotenoid lutein (CL) and CoQ10 combined with doxorubicin on the MCF7 cell line.Materials and Methods: Evaluation of cancer cell growth inhibition by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, free radical scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) test with DCFH reagent, measurement of membrane lipid damage by lipid peroxidation test with thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reagent, and measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic antioxidants were performed using the ZellBio kit.Results and Discussion: Compared with the doxorubicin group, CoQ10 and lutein at high concentrations significantly reduced cancer cell growth by 65% and 60.19%, respectively (p < 0.01). A significant decrease in GPx and SOD enzyme activities was observed with 10 μg/mL CoQ10 (by 66.52% and 63.55%) and lutein (by 64.50% and 66.20%), (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01), respectively. CoQ10 and lutein at 10 μg/mL increased the level of malondialdehyde by 76.66% and 76.80%, respectively (MDA; p < 0.001). CoQ10 and lutein treatment groups at 10 μg/mL significantly increased intracellular ROS by 58.32% and 57.49%, respectively (p < 0.001). Cancer cells' metabolism is higher than normal cells, associated with increased oxidative stress. The increase in oxidative stress is correlated with a decrease in cell viability, which indicates the role of oxidative damage in the cancer cell line.Conclusions: This study suggests that using supplements such as CL and CoQ10 may help reduce cancer cell growth as adjunctive therapy with doxorubicin. As shown in this study, the use of high-dose supplements can cause oxidative stress and inhibit the growth of cancer cells by inducing ROS and reducing antioxidants and it benefits the therapeutic process by inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.

Journal

Applied In Vitro ToxicologyMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 2021

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