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Special Precautions for Managing Pediatric AIDS

Special Precautions for Managing Pediatric AIDS Special Precautions for Managing Pédiatrie AIDS • • on a case on by Kristin White more children with HIV, AIDS, and ARC enter the nation's hospitals, the parents of other patients and the hospital workers worry if these children pose a threat to those around them. CDC hospital guidelines are identical for adult and pédiatrie AIDS patients. They emphasize blood and body fluid precautions and mandate the use of gloves for any medical contact, but do not recommend segregating these patients. When children with AIDS are hospitalized they are usually placed in available pédiatrie beds, or on adult floors when space is tight. Apart from careful supervision, the AIDS children are not isolated. Beyond CDC guidelines, infection control decisions are made case by case, more to protect the immunosuppressed child from infections than to prevent other children from catching HIV. "You have to be careful about exposing patients with AIDS to other children who may be harboring undiagnosed infections," says Dr. Cecelia Hutto, a fellow in pediatrics at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Other pédiatrie patients are extremely unlikely to pick up the retrovirus from an infected child, since it is spread only by sexual contact and contaminated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Special Precautions for Managing Pediatric AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 1 (2) – Sep 1, 1987

Special Precautions for Managing Pediatric AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 1 (2) – Sep 1, 1987

Abstract

Special Precautions for Managing Pédiatrie AIDS • • on a case on by Kristin White more children with HIV, AIDS, and ARC enter the nation's hospitals, the parents of other patients and the hospital workers worry if these children pose a threat to those around them. CDC hospital guidelines are identical for adult and pédiatrie AIDS patients. They emphasize blood and body fluid precautions and mandate the use of gloves for any medical contact, but do not recommend segregating these patients. When children with AIDS are hospitalized they are usually placed in available pédiatrie beds, or on adult floors when space is tight. Apart from careful supervision, the AIDS children are not isolated. Beyond CDC guidelines, infection control decisions are made case by case, more to protect the immunosuppressed child from infections than to prevent other children from catching HIV. "You have to be careful about exposing patients with AIDS to other children who may be harboring undiagnosed infections," says Dr. Cecelia Hutto, a fellow in pediatrics at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Other pédiatrie patients are extremely unlikely to pick up the retrovirus from an infected child, since it is spread only by sexual contact and contaminated

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1987.1.10
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Special Precautions for Managing Pédiatrie AIDS • • on a case on by Kristin White more children with HIV, AIDS, and ARC enter the nation's hospitals, the parents of other patients and the hospital workers worry if these children pose a threat to those around them. CDC hospital guidelines are identical for adult and pédiatrie AIDS patients. They emphasize blood and body fluid precautions and mandate the use of gloves for any medical contact, but do not recommend segregating these patients. When children with AIDS are hospitalized they are usually placed in available pédiatrie beds, or on adult floors when space is tight. Apart from careful supervision, the AIDS children are not isolated. Beyond CDC guidelines, infection control decisions are made case by case, more to protect the immunosuppressed child from infections than to prevent other children from catching HIV. "You have to be careful about exposing patients with AIDS to other children who may be harboring undiagnosed infections," says Dr. Cecelia Hutto, a fellow in pediatrics at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Other pédiatrie patients are extremely unlikely to pick up the retrovirus from an infected child, since it is spread only by sexual contact and contaminated

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Sep 1, 1987

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