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Social Support Among Gay Men with AIDS or at High Risk for AIDS

Social Support Among Gay Men with AIDS or at High Risk for AIDS Social Gay Men with AIDS or at Support Among High Risk for AIDS dispose an individual to risk-taking behavior which can result in accidents or suicide, and 3) stressful circumstances which can lead to a lack of social ties and resources. Any or all of these may alter the person's susceptibility and may be associated with a wide range of disease outcomes resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates. Nervous, hormonal, and immunologie control systems have frequently been linked to disease through stress-related factors in the environment. Previous studies have determined that individuals develop a variety of psychological responses when diagnosed as having AIDS. For example, feelings of sadness, hopelessness, guilt, low self-esteem, and worthlessness are frequently found in PWAs. Gay men who are already partially isolated from society due to the stigma associated with their sexual preference may have limited or atypical social support.4 An AIDS diagnosis adds to the isolation. Family support systems, often already diminished, may completely disappear. Economics also plays a significant role in health and rehabilitation. PWAs are not only coping with the severe symptoms associated with their illness, but also social isolation and stigmatization. Crystal and Jackson5 identified economics as a factor http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Social Support Among Gay Men with AIDS or at High Risk for AIDS

Social Support Among Gay Men with AIDS or at High Risk for AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (4) – Aug 1, 1993

Abstract

Social Gay Men with AIDS or at Support Among High Risk for AIDS dispose an individual to risk-taking behavior which can result in accidents or suicide, and 3) stressful circumstances which can lead to a lack of social ties and resources. Any or all of these may alter the person's susceptibility and may be associated with a wide range of disease outcomes resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates. Nervous, hormonal, and immunologie control systems have frequently been linked to disease through stress-related factors in the environment. Previous studies have determined that individuals develop a variety of psychological responses when diagnosed as having AIDS. For example, feelings of sadness, hopelessness, guilt, low self-esteem, and worthlessness are frequently found in PWAs. Gay men who are already partially isolated from society due to the stigma associated with their sexual preference may have limited or atypical social support.4 An AIDS diagnosis adds to the isolation. Family support systems, often already diminished, may completely disappear. Economics also plays a significant role in health and rehabilitation. PWAs are not only coping with the severe symptoms associated with their illness, but also social isolation and stigmatization. Crystal and Jackson5 identified economics as a factor

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.213
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social Gay Men with AIDS or at Support Among High Risk for AIDS dispose an individual to risk-taking behavior which can result in accidents or suicide, and 3) stressful circumstances which can lead to a lack of social ties and resources. Any or all of these may alter the person's susceptibility and may be associated with a wide range of disease outcomes resulting in increased morbidity and mortality rates. Nervous, hormonal, and immunologie control systems have frequently been linked to disease through stress-related factors in the environment. Previous studies have determined that individuals develop a variety of psychological responses when diagnosed as having AIDS. For example, feelings of sadness, hopelessness, guilt, low self-esteem, and worthlessness are frequently found in PWAs. Gay men who are already partially isolated from society due to the stigma associated with their sexual preference may have limited or atypical social support.4 An AIDS diagnosis adds to the isolation. Family support systems, often already diminished, may completely disappear. Economics also plays a significant role in health and rehabilitation. PWAs are not only coping with the severe symptoms associated with their illness, but also social isolation and stigmatization. Crystal and Jackson5 identified economics as a factor

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Aug 1, 1993

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