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Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections

Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections Liposomal Aminoglycosides and TLC G-65 Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections By Christine E. Swenson, Ph.D., Frank Pilkiewicz, Ph.D., and Michael H. Cynamon, M.D. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are occasionally associated with pulmonary disease or a avium-intracellulare (MAI) or organisms identified as belonging to the Mycobacterium self-limiting lymphadenitis1 in-nonimmunocompromised hosts. Prior to the recognition and spread of AIDS, dissemi- nated disease with these or other nontuberculous mycobacteria was rare.2 However, disseminated MAI is now recognized as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS, being reported in up to 50 percent of patients with this syndrome.35 The MAI group consists of at least 31 serotypes. MAI are acid-fast organisms that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are found in soil and water and can cause disease in a variety of birds and mammals. They are taxonomically distinct from M. tuberculosis, and are classified as slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacteria. Like other mycobacteria, MAI is capable of surviving and multiplying intracellularly. The signs and symptoms of disseminated MAI infection in AIDS patients are variable. Usually there is a high fever, often associated with drenching night sweats along with progressive weight loss, weakness, malaise, diarrhea, and overall clinical deterioration. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections

Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Abstract

Liposomal Aminoglycosides and TLC G-65 Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections By Christine E. Swenson, Ph.D., Frank Pilkiewicz, Ph.D., and Michael H. Cynamon, M.D. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are occasionally associated with pulmonary disease or a avium-intracellulare (MAI) or organisms identified as belonging to the Mycobacterium self-limiting lymphadenitis1 in-nonimmunocompromised hosts. Prior to the recognition and spread of AIDS, dissemi- nated disease with these or other nontuberculous mycobacteria was rare.2 However, disseminated MAI is now recognized as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS, being reported in up to 50 percent of patients with this syndrome.35 The MAI group consists of at least 31 serotypes. MAI are acid-fast organisms that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are found in soil and water and can cause disease in a variety of birds and mammals. They are taxonomically distinct from M. tuberculosis, and are classified as slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacteria. Like other mycobacteria, MAI is capable of surviving and multiplying intracellularly. The signs and symptoms of disseminated MAI infection in AIDS patients are variable. Usually there is a high fever, often associated with drenching night sweats along with progressive weight loss, weakness, malaise, diarrhea, and overall clinical deterioration.

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
Liposomal Aminoglycosides and TLC G-65
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1991.5.290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Liposomal Aminoglycosides and TLC G-65 Potential Role in the Therapy of Disseminated Mycobacterium Avium-Intracellulare Infections By Christine E. Swenson, Ph.D., Frank Pilkiewicz, Ph.D., and Michael H. Cynamon, M.D. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are occasionally associated with pulmonary disease or a avium-intracellulare (MAI) or organisms identified as belonging to the Mycobacterium self-limiting lymphadenitis1 in-nonimmunocompromised hosts. Prior to the recognition and spread of AIDS, dissemi- nated disease with these or other nontuberculous mycobacteria was rare.2 However, disseminated MAI is now recognized as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS, being reported in up to 50 percent of patients with this syndrome.35 The MAI group consists of at least 31 serotypes. MAI are acid-fast organisms that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are found in soil and water and can cause disease in a variety of birds and mammals. They are taxonomically distinct from M. tuberculosis, and are classified as slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacteria. Like other mycobacteria, MAI is capable of surviving and multiplying intracellularly. The signs and symptoms of disseminated MAI infection in AIDS patients are variable. Usually there is a high fever, often associated with drenching night sweats along with progressive weight loss, weakness, malaise, diarrhea, and overall clinical deterioration.

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1991

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