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Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS

Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS By MichaelPizzi, M.S., O.T.R./L. Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for ulation. It is estimated that there will be over 3,000 cumulative cases of full-blown AIDS in children 0 to 13 years old by 1991, and 10,000 to 20,000 asymptomatic HIV-infected children.1 These children and their care givers will need appropriate medical, social, and rehabilitation services to function and develop. Occupational therapy will be necessary to assist these children in skill and motor development and to maintain skills they already have. Occupational therapy will be necessary to train care givers in handling techniques and strategies to help their children function, despite having a chronic, progressive, and terminal illness. Maria is 16 months old, an age at which she should be walking alone, exploring different objects and and beginning to say words. She cannot places, sit without support, let alone stand; she can only sloivly follow a toy that passes before her eyes. She will not even reach for something that is brightly colored or that makes noises; she has lost interest in people and things and does not crawl. Maria's parents are IVdrug users. Tommy is 11 years old and in the fifth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (6) – Dec 1, 1989

Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (6) – Dec 1, 1989

Abstract

Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS By MichaelPizzi, M.S., O.T.R./L. Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for ulation. It is estimated that there will be over 3,000 cumulative cases of full-blown AIDS in children 0 to 13 years old by 1991, and 10,000 to 20,000 asymptomatic HIV-infected children.1 These children and their care givers will need appropriate medical, social, and rehabilitation services to function and develop. Occupational therapy will be necessary to assist these children in skill and motor development and to maintain skills they already have. Occupational therapy will be necessary to train care givers in handling techniques and strategies to help their children function, despite having a chronic, progressive, and terminal illness. Maria is 16 months old, an age at which she should be walking alone, exploring different objects and and beginning to say words. She cannot places, sit without support, let alone stand; she can only sloivly follow a toy that passes before her eyes. She will not even reach for something that is brightly colored or that makes noises; she has lost interest in people and things and does not crawl. Maria's parents are IVdrug users. Tommy is 11 years old and in the fifth

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1989.3.31
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Children with HIV Infection, ARC, and AIDS By MichaelPizzi, M.S., O.T.R./L. Occupational Therapy: Creating Possibilities for ulation. It is estimated that there will be over 3,000 cumulative cases of full-blown AIDS in children 0 to 13 years old by 1991, and 10,000 to 20,000 asymptomatic HIV-infected children.1 These children and their care givers will need appropriate medical, social, and rehabilitation services to function and develop. Occupational therapy will be necessary to assist these children in skill and motor development and to maintain skills they already have. Occupational therapy will be necessary to train care givers in handling techniques and strategies to help their children function, despite having a chronic, progressive, and terminal illness. Maria is 16 months old, an age at which she should be walking alone, exploring different objects and and beginning to say words. She cannot places, sit without support, let alone stand; she can only sloivly follow a toy that passes before her eyes. She will not even reach for something that is brightly colored or that makes noises; she has lost interest in people and things and does not crawl. Maria's parents are IVdrug users. Tommy is 11 years old and in the fifth

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1989

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