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Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease

Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease By Lisa M. Salvati, M.D. frequently seek alternative means of optimizing immune function to prevent disease progression. Improving nutrition with HIV disease. These include: increased levels of tumor necrosis factor Patients with HIV infection of the degree of wasting, depletion of potassium, body fat, serum protein concentration, intracellular water volume, (TNF), hypertriglyceridemia independent the gastrointestinal tract will continue to function physiologically. Also, there is a greater chance for infection at the needle catheter site in parenteral feedings. ings are preferred over parenteral, since has not been shown to reverse any of the cellular immunodeficiency caused by HIV infection, but the quality of life has, in many cases, been improved. There is limited information available regarding nutrition and HIV disease. It has been noted, throughout the literature available, that PWAs frequently develop significant malnutrition and wasting.1 The few nutritional intervention strategies that do exist have been oriented toward the clinically advanced stages of HIV progressive depletion of body cell mass, decreased albumin and increased total serum protein levels, decreased iron binding capacity and selenium deficiency, as well as deficiencies with stress of zinc, magnesium, and amino acids.5~7 Nutritional Assessment Vitamins and Trace Element Deficiencies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Abstract

Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease By Lisa M. Salvati, M.D. frequently seek alternative means of optimizing immune function to prevent disease progression. Improving nutrition with HIV disease. These include: increased levels of tumor necrosis factor Patients with HIV infection of the degree of wasting, depletion of potassium, body fat, serum protein concentration, intracellular water volume, (TNF), hypertriglyceridemia independent the gastrointestinal tract will continue to function physiologically. Also, there is a greater chance for infection at the needle catheter site in parenteral feedings. ings are preferred over parenteral, since has not been shown to reverse any of the cellular immunodeficiency caused by HIV infection, but the quality of life has, in many cases, been improved. There is limited information available regarding nutrition and HIV disease. It has been noted, throughout the literature available, that PWAs frequently develop significant malnutrition and wasting.1 The few nutritional intervention strategies that do exist have been oriented toward the clinically advanced stages of HIV progressive depletion of body cell mass, decreased albumin and increased total serum protein levels, decreased iron binding capacity and selenium deficiency, as well as deficiencies with stress of zinc, magnesium, and amino acids.5~7 Nutritional Assessment Vitamins and Trace Element Deficiencies

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.312
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nutritional Deficiencies in HIV Disease By Lisa M. Salvati, M.D. frequently seek alternative means of optimizing immune function to prevent disease progression. Improving nutrition with HIV disease. These include: increased levels of tumor necrosis factor Patients with HIV infection of the degree of wasting, depletion of potassium, body fat, serum protein concentration, intracellular water volume, (TNF), hypertriglyceridemia independent the gastrointestinal tract will continue to function physiologically. Also, there is a greater chance for infection at the needle catheter site in parenteral feedings. ings are preferred over parenteral, since has not been shown to reverse any of the cellular immunodeficiency caused by HIV infection, but the quality of life has, in many cases, been improved. There is limited information available regarding nutrition and HIV disease. It has been noted, throughout the literature available, that PWAs frequently develop significant malnutrition and wasting.1 The few nutritional intervention strategies that do exist have been oriented toward the clinically advanced stages of HIV progressive depletion of body cell mass, decreased albumin and increased total serum protein levels, decreased iron binding capacity and selenium deficiency, as well as deficiencies with stress of zinc, magnesium, and amino acids.5~7 Nutritional Assessment Vitamins and Trace Element Deficiencies

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1993

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