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Natural History Study of Pediatric AIDS Uncovers New Findings

Natural History Study of Pediatric AIDS Uncovers New Findings Natural History Study of Pédiatrie AIDS Uncovers New Findings By John Lauerman Kenneth Mclntosh, M.D. from the University of Colorado to be the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital, Boston, MA in 1978, his main interests were in respiratory and diagnostic virology and general pédiatrie infectious diseases. Like so many other doctors, he never expected that the focus of his research and clinical studies would soon center on a baffling new disease called AIDS. From 1962 until 1985, Dr. Mclntosh was principally active in studying respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), one of the most important viruses in children in this country. RSV has been called the "Houdini virus" because of its ability to slip by the immune system, even in those who have been exposed to the virus as recently as one year previously. The infection can cause severe problems in children's health care facilities, where it spreads rapidly from one infant to the next. Dr. Mclntosh was active in finding ways to halt the spread of RSV in hospitals and clinics. But the threat of RSV was overshadowed in early 1985, according to Dr. Mclntosh, now professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Natural History Study of Pediatric AIDS Uncovers New Findings

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (6) – Dec 1, 1989

Natural History Study of Pediatric AIDS Uncovers New Findings

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (6) – Dec 1, 1989

Abstract

Natural History Study of Pédiatrie AIDS Uncovers New Findings By John Lauerman Kenneth Mclntosh, M.D. from the University of Colorado to be the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital, Boston, MA in 1978, his main interests were in respiratory and diagnostic virology and general pédiatrie infectious diseases. Like so many other doctors, he never expected that the focus of his research and clinical studies would soon center on a baffling new disease called AIDS. From 1962 until 1985, Dr. Mclntosh was principally active in studying respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), one of the most important viruses in children in this country. RSV has been called the "Houdini virus" because of its ability to slip by the immune system, even in those who have been exposed to the virus as recently as one year previously. The infection can cause severe problems in children's health care facilities, where it spreads rapidly from one infant to the next. Dr. Mclntosh was active in finding ways to halt the spread of RSV in hospitals and clinics. But the threat of RSV was overshadowed in early 1985, according to Dr. Mclntosh, now professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1989.3.21
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Natural History Study of Pédiatrie AIDS Uncovers New Findings By John Lauerman Kenneth Mclntosh, M.D. from the University of Colorado to be the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at Children's Hospital, Boston, MA in 1978, his main interests were in respiratory and diagnostic virology and general pédiatrie infectious diseases. Like so many other doctors, he never expected that the focus of his research and clinical studies would soon center on a baffling new disease called AIDS. From 1962 until 1985, Dr. Mclntosh was principally active in studying respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), one of the most important viruses in children in this country. RSV has been called the "Houdini virus" because of its ability to slip by the immune system, even in those who have been exposed to the virus as recently as one year previously. The infection can cause severe problems in children's health care facilities, where it spreads rapidly from one infant to the next. Dr. Mclntosh was active in finding ways to halt the spread of RSV in hospitals and clinics. But the threat of RSV was overshadowed in early 1985, according to Dr. Mclntosh, now professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1989

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