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Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals

Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals By Christine Hannema, M.S., R.D., Mabel M. Chan, Ph.D., R.D., and David J. Canty, M.S. Introduction an effective treatment can be found for the AIDS virus, the primary focus of care needs to be on comfort and minimizing the risk of opportunistic infections. Dietary modifications have been shown to help alleviate many of the discomforting and often painful symptoms of AIDS, hence nutritional intervention can aid in improving the overall quality of life for the person living with AIDS (PWAs).1,2 Over the past decade, the area of nutrition and AIDS has been explored in some detail. Most of the related studies are clinically oriented and focus on the nutritional status and complications associated with HIV/AIDS.3-5 The number of community-based studies remains surprisingly low.6,7 Community food programs for PWAs have become common, welcome sights to those in need; some programs even provide home delivery.8 Understanding how well PWAs are able to utilize the nutritional support provided by these well-intended organizations may help to improve support services and, ultimately, client life quality. The pre- population receiving meals. home-delivered Methodology Study approval was obtained through the Committee on Activities Involving Human Subjects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals

Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 9 (6) – Dec 1, 1995

Abstract

Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals By Christine Hannema, M.S., R.D., Mabel M. Chan, Ph.D., R.D., and David J. Canty, M.S. Introduction an effective treatment can be found for the AIDS virus, the primary focus of care needs to be on comfort and minimizing the risk of opportunistic infections. Dietary modifications have been shown to help alleviate many of the discomforting and often painful symptoms of AIDS, hence nutritional intervention can aid in improving the overall quality of life for the person living with AIDS (PWAs).1,2 Over the past decade, the area of nutrition and AIDS has been explored in some detail. Most of the related studies are clinically oriented and focus on the nutritional status and complications associated with HIV/AIDS.3-5 The number of community-based studies remains surprisingly low.6,7 Community food programs for PWAs have become common, welcome sights to those in need; some programs even provide home delivery.8 Understanding how well PWAs are able to utilize the nutritional support provided by these well-intended organizations may help to improve support services and, ultimately, client life quality. The pre- population receiving meals. home-delivered Methodology Study approval was obtained through the Committee on Activities Involving Human Subjects

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1995.9.290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Meal Consumption of AIDS Patients and Home Delivered Meals By Christine Hannema, M.S., R.D., Mabel M. Chan, Ph.D., R.D., and David J. Canty, M.S. Introduction an effective treatment can be found for the AIDS virus, the primary focus of care needs to be on comfort and minimizing the risk of opportunistic infections. Dietary modifications have been shown to help alleviate many of the discomforting and often painful symptoms of AIDS, hence nutritional intervention can aid in improving the overall quality of life for the person living with AIDS (PWAs).1,2 Over the past decade, the area of nutrition and AIDS has been explored in some detail. Most of the related studies are clinically oriented and focus on the nutritional status and complications associated with HIV/AIDS.3-5 The number of community-based studies remains surprisingly low.6,7 Community food programs for PWAs have become common, welcome sights to those in need; some programs even provide home delivery.8 Understanding how well PWAs are able to utilize the nutritional support provided by these well-intended organizations may help to improve support services and, ultimately, client life quality. The pre- population receiving meals. home-delivered Methodology Study approval was obtained through the Committee on Activities Involving Human Subjects

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1995

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