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Managing AIDS Public Affairs

Managing AIDS Public Affairs Managing AIDS Public Affairs • • Hospitals Need By Marion E. Glick, M.A. Skill in Media Relations • demic medical center, you probably have had AIDS inquiries from the media, employees, or interested members of the public. As the AIDS epidemic grows, so will these and other AIDS-related public relations responsibilities. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions care for two-thirds of the AIDS patients in Baltimore, with 14 AIDS inpatients on any given day. My experience as the AIDS spokesperson at Hopkins has shown me that preparation and problem solving can make the public relations demands of AIDS manageable and even advantageous. WHETHER you handle public relations for a small commu- nity hospital or a large aca- Often, the print tabloids, radio talk shows, and made-for-TV-movies follow a such as the death of Rock Hudson. Although media stories may forecast the types of public inquiries you get, they are not always the best source to keep you ahead and help you prepare. To stay ahead, review the literature used by the media and health professionals—scientific publications including New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Nature, and Journal of the American Medical Association. To make it easier on yourself, stick to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Managing AIDS Public Affairs

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 1 (2) – Sep 1, 1987

Managing AIDS Public Affairs

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 1 (2) – Sep 1, 1987

Abstract

Managing AIDS Public Affairs • • Hospitals Need By Marion E. Glick, M.A. Skill in Media Relations • demic medical center, you probably have had AIDS inquiries from the media, employees, or interested members of the public. As the AIDS epidemic grows, so will these and other AIDS-related public relations responsibilities. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions care for two-thirds of the AIDS patients in Baltimore, with 14 AIDS inpatients on any given day. My experience as the AIDS spokesperson at Hopkins has shown me that preparation and problem solving can make the public relations demands of AIDS manageable and even advantageous. WHETHER you handle public relations for a small commu- nity hospital or a large aca- Often, the print tabloids, radio talk shows, and made-for-TV-movies follow a such as the death of Rock Hudson. Although media stories may forecast the types of public inquiries you get, they are not always the best source to keep you ahead and help you prepare. To stay ahead, review the literature used by the media and health professionals—scientific publications including New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Nature, and Journal of the American Medical Association. To make it easier on yourself, stick to

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1987.1.15
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Managing AIDS Public Affairs • • Hospitals Need By Marion E. Glick, M.A. Skill in Media Relations • demic medical center, you probably have had AIDS inquiries from the media, employees, or interested members of the public. As the AIDS epidemic grows, so will these and other AIDS-related public relations responsibilities. The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions care for two-thirds of the AIDS patients in Baltimore, with 14 AIDS inpatients on any given day. My experience as the AIDS spokesperson at Hopkins has shown me that preparation and problem solving can make the public relations demands of AIDS manageable and even advantageous. WHETHER you handle public relations for a small commu- nity hospital or a large aca- Often, the print tabloids, radio talk shows, and made-for-TV-movies follow a such as the death of Rock Hudson. Although media stories may forecast the types of public inquiries you get, they are not always the best source to keep you ahead and help you prepare. To stay ahead, review the literature used by the media and health professionals—scientific publications including New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Nature, and Journal of the American Medical Association. To make it easier on yourself, stick to

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Sep 1, 1987

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