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Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor Letters to the Editor • • • found the article "Long-Term Survival and HIV Disease" in your June 1992 issue to be quite informative. However, Dr. R. Grossman made a statement about diet with which I must take exception. He stated that "the bowel changes caused by HIV enteropathy resemble those in celiac disease; thus patients may benefit from the gluten-free diet used in celiac disease." The villal flattening seen in celiac disease is a result of an autoimmune response to gluten, a protein found in wheat, oats, and some other grains. This is a simple allergic type reaction. A diet free of gluten eliminates the allergen from contact with the intestinal mucosa. Then the autoimmune response shuts down; intestinal mucosal cells regenerate, and villa reform; and diarrhea and mal- I Thank you for a journal that fills an important need for the AIDS caregiving community. Candice Pert and coworkers initiated Dietitian Ottawa General Hospital Canada Joseph Murphy development of Peptide T, the N terminal will have no effect on their intestinal mucosa. And a gluten-free diet is very difficult to follow since it is so restrictive. Celiac patients must eliminate any food with wheat, oats, barley, etc.; http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Letters to the Editor

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Letters to the Editor

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Abstract

Letters to the Editor • • • found the article "Long-Term Survival and HIV Disease" in your June 1992 issue to be quite informative. However, Dr. R. Grossman made a statement about diet with which I must take exception. He stated that "the bowel changes caused by HIV enteropathy resemble those in celiac disease; thus patients may benefit from the gluten-free diet used in celiac disease." The villal flattening seen in celiac disease is a result of an autoimmune response to gluten, a protein found in wheat, oats, and some other grains. This is a simple allergic type reaction. A diet free of gluten eliminates the allergen from contact with the intestinal mucosa. Then the autoimmune response shuts down; intestinal mucosal cells regenerate, and villa reform; and diarrhea and mal- I Thank you for a journal that fills an important need for the AIDS caregiving community. Candice Pert and coworkers initiated Dietitian Ottawa General Hospital Canada Joseph Murphy development of Peptide T, the N terminal will have no effect on their intestinal mucosa. And a gluten-free diet is very difficult to follow since it is so restrictive. Celiac patients must eliminate any food with wheat, oats, barley, etc.;

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.2b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Letters to the Editor • • • found the article "Long-Term Survival and HIV Disease" in your June 1992 issue to be quite informative. However, Dr. R. Grossman made a statement about diet with which I must take exception. He stated that "the bowel changes caused by HIV enteropathy resemble those in celiac disease; thus patients may benefit from the gluten-free diet used in celiac disease." The villal flattening seen in celiac disease is a result of an autoimmune response to gluten, a protein found in wheat, oats, and some other grains. This is a simple allergic type reaction. A diet free of gluten eliminates the allergen from contact with the intestinal mucosa. Then the autoimmune response shuts down; intestinal mucosal cells regenerate, and villa reform; and diarrhea and mal- I Thank you for a journal that fills an important need for the AIDS caregiving community. Candice Pert and coworkers initiated Dietitian Ottawa General Hospital Canada Joseph Murphy development of Peptide T, the N terminal will have no effect on their intestinal mucosa. And a gluten-free diet is very difficult to follow since it is so restrictive. Celiac patients must eliminate any food with wheat, oats, barley, etc.;

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Feb 1, 1993

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