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Infection Control Update

Infection Control Update Infection Control • • • Update By Gail Makulowich FDA Warns About Needlestick Hazards of Piggyback IVs The FDA has warned trators and other health effectively. Products with these characteristics are currently being marketed. about the risk of needlestick injuries from exposed hypodermic needles used as a connection between two pieces of intravenous (IV) equipment, usually called a "piggyback" or "intermittent IV." Research indicates that IV tubing and needle assemblies are associated with a higher risk of needlestick injuries than any other needle devices, such as disposable syringes. The FDA has received at least 24 reports of situations in which hypodermic needles have broken off inside IV administration set ports. In these cases, needles could travel directly into patients' blood- hospital adminisprofessionals For more information about the risks of needlestick injuries associated with exposed needles used for IV equipment, contact Thomas Arrowsmith-Lowe, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, HFZ-70, 1390 Piccard Drive, Rockville, MD 20850; (301) 427-1060. Study Shows That OB/GYN Nurses Are Not Using Protective Barriers A recent survey of never wear more than 300 OB/GYN nurses found that 74.8 percent streams, causing injury. These needlestick injuries could transmit bloodborne pathogens such as HIV or needleless http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Abstract

Infection Control • • • Update By Gail Makulowich FDA Warns About Needlestick Hazards of Piggyback IVs The FDA has warned trators and other health effectively. Products with these characteristics are currently being marketed. about the risk of needlestick injuries from exposed hypodermic needles used as a connection between two pieces of intravenous (IV) equipment, usually called a "piggyback" or "intermittent IV." Research indicates that IV tubing and needle assemblies are associated with a higher risk of needlestick injuries than any other needle devices, such as disposable syringes. The FDA has received at least 24 reports of situations in which hypodermic needles have broken off inside IV administration set ports. In these cases, needles could travel directly into patients' blood- hospital adminisprofessionals For more information about the risks of needlestick injuries associated with exposed needles used for IV equipment, contact Thomas Arrowsmith-Lowe, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, HFZ-70, 1390 Piccard Drive, Rockville, MD 20850; (301) 427-1060. Study Shows That OB/GYN Nurses Are Not Using Protective Barriers A recent survey of never wear more than 300 OB/GYN nurses found that 74.8 percent streams, causing injury. These needlestick injuries could transmit bloodborne pathogens such as HIV or needleless

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.44
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Infection Control • • • Update By Gail Makulowich FDA Warns About Needlestick Hazards of Piggyback IVs The FDA has warned trators and other health effectively. Products with these characteristics are currently being marketed. about the risk of needlestick injuries from exposed hypodermic needles used as a connection between two pieces of intravenous (IV) equipment, usually called a "piggyback" or "intermittent IV." Research indicates that IV tubing and needle assemblies are associated with a higher risk of needlestick injuries than any other needle devices, such as disposable syringes. The FDA has received at least 24 reports of situations in which hypodermic needles have broken off inside IV administration set ports. In these cases, needles could travel directly into patients' blood- hospital adminisprofessionals For more information about the risks of needlestick injuries associated with exposed needles used for IV equipment, contact Thomas Arrowsmith-Lowe, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, HFZ-70, 1390 Piccard Drive, Rockville, MD 20850; (301) 427-1060. Study Shows That OB/GYN Nurses Are Not Using Protective Barriers A recent survey of never wear more than 300 OB/GYN nurses found that 74.8 percent streams, causing injury. These needlestick injuries could transmit bloodborne pathogens such as HIV or needleless

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Feb 1, 1993

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