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Infection Control Update

Infection Control Update Infection Control • • • Update APIC Calls for OSHA, CDC, and FDA to Issue More Specific Guidelines for Medical Devices The CDC, OSHA, and the FDA have all issued guidelines on device-mediated bloodborne infections. However, to significantly curtail the 800,000 accidental needlestick and sharp injuries that occur each year, these agencies must be more specific, according to the Association for Practitioners in Infection Control (APIC). In a recent position paper, APIC noted the devices linked most frequently to occupational injuries as: disposable needled syringes used for injection, prefilled car- By Gail S. Makulowich The Cost of Purchasing Needlestick Reduction Devices is Offset by the Costs Saved for Sharps Injuries to Health Care Workers Health care worker injuries caused by needles and sharps occur one to two times a day at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Yet 59 percent of these injuries could be prevented by the use of new needlestick reduction devices, according to research presented at the 1993 Clinical Research Meeting held this spring in Washington, D.C. New needleless or sheathed-needle systems have been developed, but not all hospitals have rushed to purchase them because some can cost up to five times more than current systems. However, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (4) – Aug 1, 1993

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (4) – Aug 1, 1993

Abstract

Infection Control • • • Update APIC Calls for OSHA, CDC, and FDA to Issue More Specific Guidelines for Medical Devices The CDC, OSHA, and the FDA have all issued guidelines on device-mediated bloodborne infections. However, to significantly curtail the 800,000 accidental needlestick and sharp injuries that occur each year, these agencies must be more specific, according to the Association for Practitioners in Infection Control (APIC). In a recent position paper, APIC noted the devices linked most frequently to occupational injuries as: disposable needled syringes used for injection, prefilled car- By Gail S. Makulowich The Cost of Purchasing Needlestick Reduction Devices is Offset by the Costs Saved for Sharps Injuries to Health Care Workers Health care worker injuries caused by needles and sharps occur one to two times a day at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Yet 59 percent of these injuries could be prevented by the use of new needlestick reduction devices, according to research presented at the 1993 Clinical Research Meeting held this spring in Washington, D.C. New needleless or sheathed-needle systems have been developed, but not all hospitals have rushed to purchase them because some can cost up to five times more than current systems. However,

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Infection Control • • • Update APIC Calls for OSHA, CDC, and FDA to Issue More Specific Guidelines for Medical Devices The CDC, OSHA, and the FDA have all issued guidelines on device-mediated bloodborne infections. However, to significantly curtail the 800,000 accidental needlestick and sharp injuries that occur each year, these agencies must be more specific, according to the Association for Practitioners in Infection Control (APIC). In a recent position paper, APIC noted the devices linked most frequently to occupational injuries as: disposable needled syringes used for injection, prefilled car- By Gail S. Makulowich The Cost of Purchasing Needlestick Reduction Devices is Offset by the Costs Saved for Sharps Injuries to Health Care Workers Health care worker injuries caused by needles and sharps occur one to two times a day at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Yet 59 percent of these injuries could be prevented by the use of new needlestick reduction devices, according to research presented at the 1993 Clinical Research Meeting held this spring in Washington, D.C. New needleless or sheathed-needle systems have been developed, but not all hospitals have rushed to purchase them because some can cost up to five times more than current systems. However,

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Aug 1, 1993

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