Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Infection Control Update

Infection Control Update Infection Control Update • • • By Gail S. Makulowich Source of M. aviutn Infections for AIDS Patients Disseminated infections from Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms develop in as many as 40 percent of patients with advanced AIDS in the United States. Disease due to MAC among AIDS and other patients in the northeastern United States has increased five- to ten-fold. MAC is a hard-to-isolated organism that is resistant to antibiotics and is not transmitted person to person. The source of MAC infection in AIDS patients has not been identified. However, a recent study identified hospital water systems as a source of MAC infections in AIDS patients at two hospitals and suggests ways to prevent these hospital-acquired infections. The researchers, led by C. Fordham von Reyn of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, determined that hot water was the source of positive cultures in the study when they matched the DNA isolates of a particular strain of M. avium from the hospital water system with DNA isolates from the patients. They attributed the MAC infection to the breathing of aerosolized MAC particles from the shower. They suggested drinking water as another possible source of MAC infection, since hot and cold http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

Infection Control Update

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 8 (6) – Dec 1, 1994

Abstract

Infection Control Update • • • By Gail S. Makulowich Source of M. aviutn Infections for AIDS Patients Disseminated infections from Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms develop in as many as 40 percent of patients with advanced AIDS in the United States. Disease due to MAC among AIDS and other patients in the northeastern United States has increased five- to ten-fold. MAC is a hard-to-isolated organism that is resistant to antibiotics and is not transmitted person to person. The source of MAC infection in AIDS patients has not been identified. However, a recent study identified hospital water systems as a source of MAC infections in AIDS patients at two hospitals and suggests ways to prevent these hospital-acquired infections. The researchers, led by C. Fordham von Reyn of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, determined that hot water was the source of positive cultures in the study when they matched the DNA isolates of a particular strain of M. avium from the hospital water system with DNA isolates from the patients. They attributed the MAC infection to the breathing of aerosolized MAC particles from the shower. They suggested drinking water as another possible source of MAC infection, since hot and cold

Loading next page...
 
/lp/mary-ann-liebert/infection-control-update-IEj7jr0abM
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1994 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1994.8.342
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Infection Control Update • • • By Gail S. Makulowich Source of M. aviutn Infections for AIDS Patients Disseminated infections from Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) organisms develop in as many as 40 percent of patients with advanced AIDS in the United States. Disease due to MAC among AIDS and other patients in the northeastern United States has increased five- to ten-fold. MAC is a hard-to-isolated organism that is resistant to antibiotics and is not transmitted person to person. The source of MAC infection in AIDS patients has not been identified. However, a recent study identified hospital water systems as a source of MAC infections in AIDS patients at two hospitals and suggests ways to prevent these hospital-acquired infections. The researchers, led by C. Fordham von Reyn of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, determined that hot water was the source of positive cultures in the study when they matched the DNA isolates of a particular strain of M. avium from the hospital water system with DNA isolates from the patients. They attributed the MAC infection to the breathing of aerosolized MAC particles from the shower. They suggested drinking water as another possible source of MAC infection, since hot and cold

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.