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Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection

Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection By Maureen Swick, R.N., M.S.N. were treated and controversy of refusal to treat by health care workers (HCWs) was neither heard nor tolerated. Who would ever have imagined that in just a decade, there would be literature on refusing to treat patients with a disease called AIDS. Most individuals enter nursing consenting to accept a standard level of risk of infection. This article supports the position that all HCWs consented to this level of risk when they entered into practice. These professionals are bound both morally and ethically to treat all patients, including patients with HIV. In most instances, the risk of contracting HIV does not exceed this standard level, which leads us into the possibility of other existing reasons for this refusal. To support this position of duty to treat, it is essential to include recommendations for alleviating HCWs' fears and biases when caring for HIV-infected Approximately ten years ago, all patients with infectious diseases The AIDS epidemic has forced the medical professions to reconsider certain fundamental principles governing their activity, and in particular the obligation to provide treatment for patients who may expose health http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Abstract

Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection By Maureen Swick, R.N., M.S.N. were treated and controversy of refusal to treat by health care workers (HCWs) was neither heard nor tolerated. Who would ever have imagined that in just a decade, there would be literature on refusing to treat patients with a disease called AIDS. Most individuals enter nursing consenting to accept a standard level of risk of infection. This article supports the position that all HCWs consented to this level of risk when they entered into practice. These professionals are bound both morally and ethically to treat all patients, including patients with HIV. In most instances, the risk of contracting HIV does not exceed this standard level, which leads us into the possibility of other existing reasons for this refusal. To support this position of duty to treat, it is essential to include recommendations for alleviating HCWs' fears and biases when caring for HIV-infected Approximately ten years ago, all patients with infectious diseases The AIDS epidemic has forced the medical professions to reconsider certain fundamental principles governing their activity, and in particular the obligation to provide treatment for patients who may expose health

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.319
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Health Care Professional Consent Issues in Caring for Patients with HIV Infection By Maureen Swick, R.N., M.S.N. were treated and controversy of refusal to treat by health care workers (HCWs) was neither heard nor tolerated. Who would ever have imagined that in just a decade, there would be literature on refusing to treat patients with a disease called AIDS. Most individuals enter nursing consenting to accept a standard level of risk of infection. This article supports the position that all HCWs consented to this level of risk when they entered into practice. These professionals are bound both morally and ethically to treat all patients, including patients with HIV. In most instances, the risk of contracting HIV does not exceed this standard level, which leads us into the possibility of other existing reasons for this refusal. To support this position of duty to treat, it is essential to include recommendations for alleviating HCWs' fears and biases when caring for HIV-infected Approximately ten years ago, all patients with infectious diseases The AIDS epidemic has forced the medical professions to reconsider certain fundamental principles governing their activity, and in particular the obligation to provide treatment for patients who may expose health

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1993

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