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Editorial

Editorial Editorial you went to hear an AIDS lecture a few years ago, you might hear the speaker make a reference or an analogy about AIDS and a certain war. It was the Viet Nam war. One of the common themes had to do with casualties, comparing how many people had died in the Viet Nam war versus how many people had died, or were dying, from AIDS. The usual remark said something to the effect that this disease called AIDS would claim more lives than the Viet Nam war. The days of the war are over and, so it seems, the novelty of the reference as a rousing tool for the speaker to wake up the back row. When the Viet Nam National Memorial Monument was unveiled in 1982 in Washington, D.C., more than 58,000 names were etched into its black granite walls. When the last CDC's AIDS Weekly Surveillance Report was released for the a total of 82,406 AIDS cases were Of those cases, 46,134 had died. How many black granite slabs this year 1988, reported. translates into I don't know. I didn't want to figure it out. Looking a little further, there are quite a few http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Editorial

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (2) – Apr 1, 1989

Editorial

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 3 (2) – Apr 1, 1989

Abstract

Editorial you went to hear an AIDS lecture a few years ago, you might hear the speaker make a reference or an analogy about AIDS and a certain war. It was the Viet Nam war. One of the common themes had to do with casualties, comparing how many people had died in the Viet Nam war versus how many people had died, or were dying, from AIDS. The usual remark said something to the effect that this disease called AIDS would claim more lives than the Viet Nam war. The days of the war are over and, so it seems, the novelty of the reference as a rousing tool for the speaker to wake up the back row. When the Viet Nam National Memorial Monument was unveiled in 1982 in Washington, D.C., more than 58,000 names were etched into its black granite walls. When the last CDC's AIDS Weekly Surveillance Report was released for the a total of 82,406 AIDS cases were Of those cases, 46,134 had died. How many black granite slabs this year 1988, reported. translates into I don't know. I didn't want to figure it out. Looking a little further, there are quite a few

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1989 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1989.3.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial you went to hear an AIDS lecture a few years ago, you might hear the speaker make a reference or an analogy about AIDS and a certain war. It was the Viet Nam war. One of the common themes had to do with casualties, comparing how many people had died in the Viet Nam war versus how many people had died, or were dying, from AIDS. The usual remark said something to the effect that this disease called AIDS would claim more lives than the Viet Nam war. The days of the war are over and, so it seems, the novelty of the reference as a rousing tool for the speaker to wake up the back row. When the Viet Nam National Memorial Monument was unveiled in 1982 in Washington, D.C., more than 58,000 names were etched into its black granite walls. When the last CDC's AIDS Weekly Surveillance Report was released for the a total of 82,406 AIDS cases were Of those cases, 46,134 had died. How many black granite slabs this year 1988, reported. translates into I don't know. I didn't want to figure it out. Looking a little further, there are quite a few

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Apr 1, 1989

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