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Diagnostic and Treatment Options

Diagnostic and Treatment Options CMV Gastrointestinal Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Options • • • By Sheila Hutman of managing this debilitating infection is identifying the virus correctly. Douglas Now that treatment is available for now found in up to 90 percent of autopsies of HIV-infected patients.2-3 It is a major cause of illness among transplant recipients and AIDS patients and has a significant effect on survival in both groups. sites, or groups do this, even if they appear endoscopically radiologically normal," he said. Not all nor do all pathologists look for CMV inclusions painstakingly gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease, the trickiest part Incidence of Gastrointestinal Disease in AIDS Patients Clinical cent of PWAs suffer from Dieterich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center, illustrates the difficulty of arriving at an accurate diagnosis in a description of his first patient with CMV colitis: A 35 year old homosexual male was admitted to Bellevue Hospital with diarrhea, dehydration, and cachexia. All stool tests were negative with several repetitions. After replacement of fluids and electrolytes, the patient was referred to the gastroenterology department with a possible diagnosis of "gay-related immunodeficiency" or GRID. Colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis and a very large, cavernous rectosigmoid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Diagnostic and Treatment Options

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Diagnostic and Treatment Options

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 5 (6) – Dec 1, 1991

Abstract

CMV Gastrointestinal Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Options • • • By Sheila Hutman of managing this debilitating infection is identifying the virus correctly. Douglas Now that treatment is available for now found in up to 90 percent of autopsies of HIV-infected patients.2-3 It is a major cause of illness among transplant recipients and AIDS patients and has a significant effect on survival in both groups. sites, or groups do this, even if they appear endoscopically radiologically normal," he said. Not all nor do all pathologists look for CMV inclusions painstakingly gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease, the trickiest part Incidence of Gastrointestinal Disease in AIDS Patients Clinical cent of PWAs suffer from Dieterich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center, illustrates the difficulty of arriving at an accurate diagnosis in a description of his first patient with CMV colitis: A 35 year old homosexual male was admitted to Bellevue Hospital with diarrhea, dehydration, and cachexia. All stool tests were negative with several repetitions. After replacement of fluids and electrolytes, the patient was referred to the gastroenterology department with a possible diagnosis of "gay-related immunodeficiency" or GRID. Colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis and a very large, cavernous rectosigmoid

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1991 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
CMV Gastrointestinal Disease
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1991.5.282
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CMV Gastrointestinal Disease Diagnostic and Treatment Options • • • By Sheila Hutman of managing this debilitating infection is identifying the virus correctly. Douglas Now that treatment is available for now found in up to 90 percent of autopsies of HIV-infected patients.2-3 It is a major cause of illness among transplant recipients and AIDS patients and has a significant effect on survival in both groups. sites, or groups do this, even if they appear endoscopically radiologically normal," he said. Not all nor do all pathologists look for CMV inclusions painstakingly gastrointestinal cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease, the trickiest part Incidence of Gastrointestinal Disease in AIDS Patients Clinical cent of PWAs suffer from Dieterich, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center, illustrates the difficulty of arriving at an accurate diagnosis in a description of his first patient with CMV colitis: A 35 year old homosexual male was admitted to Bellevue Hospital with diarrhea, dehydration, and cachexia. All stool tests were negative with several repetitions. After replacement of fluids and electrolytes, the patient was referred to the gastroenterology department with a possible diagnosis of "gay-related immunodeficiency" or GRID. Colonoscopy revealed patchy colitis and a very large, cavernous rectosigmoid

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1991

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