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Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia

Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia By Kevin D. Blanchet better tolerated, convenient, and less cost¬ ly treatments against PCP. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) remains a major life-threat¬ ening manifestation of HIV infec¬ tion. Eighty-five percent of PWAs will experience a bout of PCP at some time during the course of their illness. Without prophylaxis, an estimated 60,000 persons with HIV infection will have new or recurrent PCP infections in 1992. While the number of cases of PCP has declined over the years, it has not been dramatic. The Gold Standard usually be tolerated without having to discontinue therapy. Still, many patients remain intolerant of the drug and require that therapy be stopped so another approach can be tried. Since bone marrow (TMP/SMX) remains the Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole Many patients are simply not taking pro¬ phylaxis; when they do, it is not 100 per¬ cent effective. This is particularly true in damage to their immune systems. When patients receive standard therapy for PCP, approximately patients with severe 80 to 95 alike. As a result of these side effects, standard therapy must be discontinued in 30 to 50 percent of all cases. Severe GI dis¬ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 6 (6) – Dec 1, 1992

Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 6 (6) – Dec 1, 1992

Abstract

Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia By Kevin D. Blanchet better tolerated, convenient, and less cost¬ ly treatments against PCP. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) remains a major life-threat¬ ening manifestation of HIV infec¬ tion. Eighty-five percent of PWAs will experience a bout of PCP at some time during the course of their illness. Without prophylaxis, an estimated 60,000 persons with HIV infection will have new or recurrent PCP infections in 1992. While the number of cases of PCP has declined over the years, it has not been dramatic. The Gold Standard usually be tolerated without having to discontinue therapy. Still, many patients remain intolerant of the drug and require that therapy be stopped so another approach can be tried. Since bone marrow (TMP/SMX) remains the Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole Many patients are simply not taking pro¬ phylaxis; when they do, it is not 100 per¬ cent effective. This is particularly true in damage to their immune systems. When patients receive standard therapy for PCP, approximately patients with severe 80 to 95 alike. As a result of these side effects, standard therapy must be discontinued in 30 to 50 percent of all cases. Severe GI dis¬

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1992 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1992.6.258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current Trends and Future Developments in the Treatment of Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia By Kevin D. Blanchet better tolerated, convenient, and less cost¬ ly treatments against PCP. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) remains a major life-threat¬ ening manifestation of HIV infec¬ tion. Eighty-five percent of PWAs will experience a bout of PCP at some time during the course of their illness. Without prophylaxis, an estimated 60,000 persons with HIV infection will have new or recurrent PCP infections in 1992. While the number of cases of PCP has declined over the years, it has not been dramatic. The Gold Standard usually be tolerated without having to discontinue therapy. Still, many patients remain intolerant of the drug and require that therapy be stopped so another approach can be tried. Since bone marrow (TMP/SMX) remains the Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole Many patients are simply not taking pro¬ phylaxis; when they do, it is not 100 per¬ cent effective. This is particularly true in damage to their immune systems. When patients receive standard therapy for PCP, approximately patients with severe 80 to 95 alike. As a result of these side effects, standard therapy must be discontinued in 30 to 50 percent of all cases. Severe GI dis¬

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1992

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