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Confidant or Informer?

Confidant or Informer? Point of View Confidant or Informer? By Jean Shelor, R.N., C.S., CAS ethical responsibility of the health care provider is to protect patients from unauthorized disclosures of information received in the One therapeutic relationship.1 Confidentiality is an explicit promise between the health care provider and the patient to reveal nothing about the patient except under conditions agreed to by the source of the subject. Health care providers have a moral, ethical, and professional obligation not to divulge information without the patient's knowledge and permission unless it is in his/her interest to do so.2 Therefore, there are limitations to the promise of confidentiality. The health care provider needs to develop a sense of professional ethics for determining when confidentiality with a patient may be broken. Court decisions have underscored the mental health professional's duty to warn and protect others, even if it means physiological treatment was initiated. patient's psychological condition began to improve and he was allowed to attend activities in other hospital areas. While engaged in recreational activities, he met a 39-year-old divorced female patient with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Within several weeks they developed a romantic relationship. The patients in this case study decided they would http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Confidant or Informer?

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Confidant or Informer?

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (6) – Dec 1, 1993

Abstract

Point of View Confidant or Informer? By Jean Shelor, R.N., C.S., CAS ethical responsibility of the health care provider is to protect patients from unauthorized disclosures of information received in the One therapeutic relationship.1 Confidentiality is an explicit promise between the health care provider and the patient to reveal nothing about the patient except under conditions agreed to by the source of the subject. Health care providers have a moral, ethical, and professional obligation not to divulge information without the patient's knowledge and permission unless it is in his/her interest to do so.2 Therefore, there are limitations to the promise of confidentiality. The health care provider needs to develop a sense of professional ethics for determining when confidentiality with a patient may be broken. Court decisions have underscored the mental health professional's duty to warn and protect others, even if it means physiological treatment was initiated. patient's psychological condition began to improve and he was allowed to attend activities in other hospital areas. While engaged in recreational activities, he met a 39-year-old divorced female patient with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Within several weeks they developed a romantic relationship. The patients in this case study decided they would

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Subject
Point of View
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.301
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Point of View Confidant or Informer? By Jean Shelor, R.N., C.S., CAS ethical responsibility of the health care provider is to protect patients from unauthorized disclosures of information received in the One therapeutic relationship.1 Confidentiality is an explicit promise between the health care provider and the patient to reveal nothing about the patient except under conditions agreed to by the source of the subject. Health care providers have a moral, ethical, and professional obligation not to divulge information without the patient's knowledge and permission unless it is in his/her interest to do so.2 Therefore, there are limitations to the promise of confidentiality. The health care provider needs to develop a sense of professional ethics for determining when confidentiality with a patient may be broken. Court decisions have underscored the mental health professional's duty to warn and protect others, even if it means physiological treatment was initiated. patient's psychological condition began to improve and he was allowed to attend activities in other hospital areas. While engaged in recreational activities, he met a 39-year-old divorced female patient with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Within several weeks they developed a romantic relationship. The patients in this case study decided they would

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Dec 1, 1993

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