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Concert Outreach

Concert Outreach Concert Outreach A Creative Approach to Adolescent HIV Education • • • By Karen Cox, R.N., B.S.N., O.C.N., and Randy Gould, M.S.Ed. Introduction what not to do and teens have often been ignoring them. AIDS, however, may now be the single most important topic in terms of educating teens. Many HIV risk reduction programs tend to follow the "Just Say No" campaigns with which teens have become only too familiar.1 Authority figures, whether teachers, clergy, health care professionals, parents, or AIDS educators, are easily and often discounted. Even peer programs tend to involve the socially acceptable "good kids" discussing HIV in schools or other such institutions. Ignoring the HIV message is reinforced when extremely few teens actually seem to get "sick." persuade adolescents to make the "right" choices regarding their health behaviors is not a new question. Smoking, alcohol or drug use, and pregnancy prevention have all presented a great challenge to adults. For centuries, adults have been telling teens How to this problem. HIV videos are of competing for the attention of incapable adolescents with MTV. Anyone speaking to a group of youths in any sort of institutional setting could not help but be identified with the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AIDS Patient Care Mary Ann Liebert

Concert Outreach

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Concert Outreach

AIDS Patient Care , Volume 7 (1) – Feb 1, 1993

Abstract

Concert Outreach A Creative Approach to Adolescent HIV Education • • • By Karen Cox, R.N., B.S.N., O.C.N., and Randy Gould, M.S.Ed. Introduction what not to do and teens have often been ignoring them. AIDS, however, may now be the single most important topic in terms of educating teens. Many HIV risk reduction programs tend to follow the "Just Say No" campaigns with which teens have become only too familiar.1 Authority figures, whether teachers, clergy, health care professionals, parents, or AIDS educators, are easily and often discounted. Even peer programs tend to involve the socially acceptable "good kids" discussing HIV in schools or other such institutions. Ignoring the HIV message is reinforced when extremely few teens actually seem to get "sick." persuade adolescents to make the "right" choices regarding their health behaviors is not a new question. Smoking, alcohol or drug use, and pregnancy prevention have all presented a great challenge to adults. For centuries, adults have been telling teens How to this problem. HIV videos are of competing for the attention of incapable adolescents with MTV. Anyone speaking to a group of youths in any sort of institutional setting could not help but be identified with the

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Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Copyright
Copyright 1993 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
ISSN
0893-5068
eISSN
1557-7449
DOI
10.1089/apc.1993.7.16
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Concert Outreach A Creative Approach to Adolescent HIV Education • • • By Karen Cox, R.N., B.S.N., O.C.N., and Randy Gould, M.S.Ed. Introduction what not to do and teens have often been ignoring them. AIDS, however, may now be the single most important topic in terms of educating teens. Many HIV risk reduction programs tend to follow the "Just Say No" campaigns with which teens have become only too familiar.1 Authority figures, whether teachers, clergy, health care professionals, parents, or AIDS educators, are easily and often discounted. Even peer programs tend to involve the socially acceptable "good kids" discussing HIV in schools or other such institutions. Ignoring the HIV message is reinforced when extremely few teens actually seem to get "sick." persuade adolescents to make the "right" choices regarding their health behaviors is not a new question. Smoking, alcohol or drug use, and pregnancy prevention have all presented a great challenge to adults. For centuries, adults have been telling teens How to this problem. HIV videos are of competing for the attention of incapable adolescents with MTV. Anyone speaking to a group of youths in any sort of institutional setting could not help but be identified with the

Journal

AIDS Patient CareMary Ann Liebert

Published: Feb 1, 1993

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